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Carus Gallery records

Creator:
Carus Gallery  Search this
Names:
Carus Isserstedt, Dorthea, 1914-2002  Search this
Extent:
3.2 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1967-2002
Summary:
The records of Carus Gallery measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1967-2002. This collection documents Dorothea Carus Isserstedt's management of the New York gallery through a small amount of business and personal correspondence; business records regarding acquisitions, sales, and consignments; intentories of artwork and rare books; exhibition catalogs, press clippings, and other printed material; and photographs depicting artwork and exhibition installations.
Scope and Contents:
The records of Carus Gallery measure 3.2 linear feet and date from 1967-2002. This collection documents Dorothea Carus Isserstedt's management of the New York gallery through a small amount of business and personal correspondence; business records regarding acquisitions, sales, and consignments; intentories of artwork and rare books; exhibition catalogs, press clippings, and other printed material; and photographs depicting artwork and exhibition installations.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 5 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1974-2000 (4 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Business Records, 1971-1996 (1.8 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 3: Inventories, 1973-2002 (0.6 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1967-1992 (0.6 linear feet; Box 3-4)

Series 5: Photographic Material, 1980s-1990s (4 folders; Box 4)
Biographical / Historical:
The Carus Gallery was founded by Dorothea Carus Isserstedt (1914-2002). The gallery's primary interest was in European Graphic Arts, specifically German Expressionism, and Russian Constructivism. The gallery exhibited works by Alexander Archipenko, Ernst Barlach, Max Beckmann, Heinrich Campendonk, Otto Dix, Lyonel Feininger, Natalia Goncharova, George Grosz, Erich Heckel, Alexej Jawlensky, Wassily Kandinsky, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Gustav Klimt, Max Klinger, Kathe Kollowitz, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, László Moholy-Nagy, Marlow Moss, Otto Mueller, Edvard Munch, Emil Nolde, Christian Rohlfs and Egon Schiele.

In 1968, following the death of her parents, Isserstedt opened the Carus Gallery, which was located on the ground level of her home at 243 E 82nd street in New York. The gallery was relocated to Madison Avenue in 1974 and finally to 1044 Madison Avenue where it remained until Isserstedt's retirement in 1996.

Dorothy was born in 1914 in Elberfeld, Germany. She studied art history and archeology at Freiburg University, receiving a doctorate in 1944. Towards the end of World War II Dorothy escaped to East Germany where she settled in Hamburg and found work as a supervisor with the British Forces Network. In 1952 she immigrated to Yorkville, NY where she worked in her father's print and framing shop. Dorothy became an American citizen in 1957.
Provenance:
The records were donated to the Archives in 2004 by Dr. Gheorghe Costinescu and Mrs. Silvelin von Scanzoni Costinescu, the heirs and executors of Dorothy Carus Isserstedt's estate.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Carus Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Insitution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Expressionism (Art) -- Germany  Search this
Constructivism (Art) -- Russia  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Futurism (Art) -- Italy  Search this
Futurism (Art) -- Russia  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Carus Gallery Records, 1967-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.carugall
See more items in:
Carus Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-carugall

Sheldon Ross Gallery records

Creator:
Sheldon Ross  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Middle Earth Gallery  Search this
United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Grosz, George, 1893-1959  Search this
Ross, Sheldon, 1925-2000  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketches
Writings
Photographs
Date:
circa 1970-2007
bulk 1976-1995
Summary:
The records of the Sheldon Ross Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, measure 1.8 linear feet and are dated 1970-2007, with the bulk of materials dating from 1976-1995. The majority of the collection consists of artists' files. About half of the materials relate to Romare Bearden's work and his relationship with Sheldon Ross, the gallery owner. Also included are artists' files regarding George Grosz and Michigan artists. The contents of artists' files vary but generally include biographical information, printed materials and photographic images. The collection also contains correspondence, exhibition files, and photographs documenting the gallery's activities.
Scope and Contents note:
The records of the Sheldon Ross Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, measure 1.8 linear feet and are dated 1970-2007, with the bulk of materials dating from 1976-1995. The majority of the collection consists of artists' files. About half of the materials relate to Romare Bearden's work and his relationship with Sheldon Ross, the gallery owner. Also included are artists' files regarding George Grosz and Michigan artists. The contents of artists' files vary but generally include biographical information, printed materials and photographic images. The collection also contains correspondence, exhibition files, and photographs documenting the gallery's activities.

The gallery records document its exhibition history, exhibition reviews, sales of artwork, and Ross' significant projects. Also included are photographs and slides documenting much of the artwork exhibited. Materials relating to Romare Bearden include writings by and about Bearden and his artwork and correspondence between Bearden and Ross during the years 1976-1989. There are many catalogs of Bearden's solo exhibitions at galleries, museums, and institutions, as well as exhibition reviews from newspapers and magazines, and images of Bearden's works.

The gallery exhibited other well-known artists including 20th century American artists and German Expressionists, notably George Grosz, who instructed Bearden at the Art Students League in New York. Found in the records are exhibition catalogues, price lists, inventory cards and artists' background materials. Also found is correspondence with museums, artists and clients, and slides and other photographic material of artwork offered by the gallery. Of note is correspondence between Sheldon Ross and the FBI concerning Ross' participation as an expert witness in a prosecution of individuals who were involved in Romare Bearden forgeries.

There are drawings of Sheldon Ross and The Sheldon Ross Galley by his son, Robert Ross. Photographs are of Sheldon Ross and Romare Bearden, Sheldon Ross with family and friends, and the predecessor gallery, Middle Earth Gallery.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged in 7 Series. Materials are generally arranged by record type and chronologically thereafter.

Series 1: Gallery History, 1976-2000 (Box 1, OV 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1982-1999 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1976-1988 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Artists' Files, 1968-2007 (Boxes 1-2; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1976-2000 (Box 2; 2 folders; OV 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Drawings by Robert Ross, after 1975, (OV 5; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographic Materials, circa 1970-2000 (Boxes 2-3, OV 5; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
The Sheldon Ross Gallery (1975-1993), Birmingham, Michigan, and later Sheldon Ross Fine Arts and Sheldon Ross Fine Arts LLC (1993-2000) were operated by Sheldon Ross until his death in 2000. The Sheldon Ross Gallery was the only gallery in the Detroit area to consistently show German Expressionist art, emphasizing graphics. However, the gallery and Ross are best known for their early and continued support of Romare Bearden's work. The exhibition history shows a balance between an interest in local artists and an effort to offer diverse artwork from broad based sources.
Provenance:
The records were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2010 by Phyllis Ross, widow of Sheldon Ross.
Restrictions:
Use of original materials requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Sheldon Ross Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Expressionism (Art) -- Germany  Search this
Arts -- Forgeries  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- Michigan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Writings
Photographs
Citation:
Sheldon Ross Gallery records, circa 1970-2007, bulk 1976-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.shelrosg
See more items in:
Sheldon Ross Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shelrosg

Albert Bloch papers

Creator:
Bloch, Albert  Search this
Names:
Bloch, Anna  Search this
Fehl, Philipp P.  Search this
Kandinsky, Wassily, 1866-1944  Search this
Klee, Paul, 1879-1940  Search this
Klinker, Emmy  Search this
Marc, Franz, 1880-1916  Search this
Penney, James, 1910-1982  Search this
Sudlow, Robert  Search this
Extent:
17.9 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
1873-2014
Summary:
The papers of painter and educator Albert Bloch measure 17.9 linear feet and date from 1873 to 2014. The collection documents his career as an artist and university professor in Lawrence, Kansas, as well as his time in Munich, Germany, as part of the Blue Rider group of German Expressionists. The collection includes biographical material, extensive personal and professional correspondence, writings, personal business records, exhibition files, printed material, photographs, and artwork. Throughout the collection are records maintained by his widow Anna Bloch on the exhibition, sale, and research of Bloch's work after his death.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and educator Albert Bloch measure 17.9 linear feet and date from 1873 to 2014. The collection documents his career as an artist and university professor in Lawrence, Kansas, as well as his time in Munich, Germany, as part of the Blue Rider group of German Expressionists. The collection includes biographical material, extensive personal and professional correspondence, writings, personal business records, exhibition files, printed material, photographs, and artwork. Throughout the collection are records maintained by his widow Anna Bloch on the exhibition, sale, and research of Bloch's work after his death.

Biographical material includes vital records, passports, chronologies, biographical summaries, family history documents, and bibliography files compiled by Anna Bloch. Correspondence is with family, friends, artists, art historians, students, museums, galleries, publishers, magazines, and others, and includes letters of both a personal and professional nature. Of note is Albert Bloch's correspondence with artists Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Emmy Klinker, Franz Marc, Philipp Fehl, and his students James Penney and Robert Sudlow.

Writings include poetry, lectures, essays, notes, and Bloch's translations of the writings of Austrian writer Karl Kraus. Included are many drafts of his book of poetry, Ventures in Verse: Selected Pieces. Also found are love notes between Albert and Anna Bloch. Writings by others include a few notebooks and loose notes by Anna Bloch, essays and lectures about Bloch's artwork, and poetry.

Personal business records include lists of artworks, price lists, sales records, and ownership records, and more recent records concerning artwork conservation; agreements, and consignment records with art galleries and dealers; and artwork shipping records, all maintained by Anna Bloch. Exhibition files are not comprehensive, and primarily document retrospective exhibitions of Bloch's artwork occurring after his death. Of note are records, including a scrapbook, for a 1997 retrospective at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Printed material includes exhibition publications, news clippings, magazines, journals, and photocopies of Bloch's work for The Mirror. Photographs depict Bloch in his home, studio, and with family and friends. Also found are many photographs of family and friends, artwork by Bloch, Blue Rider exhibition photographs taken by artist Gabriele Münter, and two photograph album "Record Books" that contain annotated photographs of his painting during the period that he lived in Germany. A small amount of artwork includes sketches by Bloch.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1873-1990s (0.4 Linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1912-2013 (6.2 Linear feet; Boxes 1-7)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1920s-1990s (3.9 Linear feet; Boxes 7-11)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, 1914-2014 (0.6 Linear feet; Box 11)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1939-2000 (0.7 Linear feet; Box 12, 19)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1911-2006 (2 Linear feet; Boxes 12-14)

Series 7: Photographic Materials, circa 1882-2013 (4.1 Linear feet; Boxes 14-21)

Series 8: Artwork, circa 1930s-1950s (0.2 Linear feet; Box 17)
Biographical / Historical:
Albert Bloch (1882-1961) was a painter and educator in Lawrence, Kansas. From 1909 to 1921, he lived and worked in Germany, where he was associated with Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) group of European modernists.

Bloch was born in St. Louis, Missouri, and as a teenager attended the St. Louis School of Fine Arts. From 1905 to 1913, he contributed numerous caricatures, cartoons, covers, and articles to the satirical newspaper The Mirror. In 1905, he married Hortense Altheimer and they lived briefly in New York City before moving to the artists' district in Munich, Germany, thanks to the financial support of William Reedy, editor of The Mirror. By 1911 Bloch had befriended prominent members of the Neue Kunstlervereinigung Munchen (NKVM), including Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc. He joined them when they later seceded from the NKVM group to form Der Blaue Reiter. Bloch exhibited six paintings in the group's first exhibition in 1911-1912. Over the next few years, Bloch exhibited his works regularly, most notably at Der Sturm Gallery. He and his family remained in Germany throughout World War I, returning to the US in 1921.

Bloch worked briefly at the Chicago Academy of Fine Art, and in 1923, settled in Lawrence, Kansas, accepting a faculty position at the University of Kansas. During this period he did not regularly exhibit his work and focused on teaching and writing. He corresponded with Austrian writer Karl Kraus, editor of Die Fackel, and began to translate Kraus' works into English. In the early 1930s, Bloch met Anna Francis at the University of Kansas and later she lived with the Bloch family, including Hortense and two sons, Bernard and Walter. After the death of his wife Hortense, Alfred married Anna in 1951. 1947, Bloch suffered a heart attack and retired from the University of Kansas. That same year a book of his poetry, Ventures in Verse: Selected Pieces, was published.

Bloch continued to paint and had a large retrospective of his work in 1955 at the University of Kansas Museum of Art. He died in December 1961 after a long illness.
Related Materials:
The Albert Bloch, the American Blue Rider Exhibition records, 1994-1997, are available at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2015 by the Albert Bloch Foundation via Scott Heffley, president. Additonal letters from Anna Bloch donated 2017 by David Strauss, Albert Bloch's cousin.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Rights:
The Albert Bloch papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Educators -- Kansas -- Lawrence  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Expressionism (Art) -- Germany  Search this
Der Blaue Reiter (Art)  Search this
Painters -- Kansas -- Lawrence  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Albert Bloch papers, 1873-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.blocalbe
See more items in:
Albert Bloch papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blocalbe

Alfred Vance Churchill papers regarding Lyonel Feininger

Creator:
Churchill, Alfred Vance, 1864-1949  Search this
Names:
Feininger, Lyonel, 1871-1956  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1888-1944
Summary:
This small collection of Alfred Vance Churchill papers regarding Lyonel Feininger measures 0.9 linear feet and dates from 1888 to 1944. Found here are 36 letters from Feininger, a painter and illustrator, to his friend Churchill and a scrapbook compiled by Churchill containing 117 sketches by Feininger, a photograph of Feininger, clippings, and 47 sketches and reproductions by Churchill. There are also additional loose clippings, an exhibition catalog, and three photographs of Feininger.
Scope and Content Note:
This small collection of Alfred Vance Churchill papers regarding Lyonel Feininger measures 0.9 linear feet and dates from 1888 to 1944. Found here are 36 long and detailed letters from Feininger, a painter and illustrator, to his friend Alfred Churchill (many letters from 1890 are illustrated), and a scrapbook compiled by Churchill containing 117 sketches by Feininger, a photograph of Feininger, clippings, and 47 sketches and reproductions by Churchill. There are also additional loose clippings and magazines, an exhibition catalog, three photographs of Feininger and one of his children.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 4 series:

Series 1: Letters to Alfred Churchill, 1890-1920 (Box 1; 5 folders)

Series 2: Printed Material, 1895-1898, 1917-1944 (Box 1; 6 folders)

Series 3: Scrapbook of Artwork, 1888-1913 (Box 1-3; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Photographs, circa 1890, 1911, 1926 (Box 1; 2 folders)
Biographical Note:
Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956), also known as Léonell Feininger, was born in New York City in 1871 to German violinist Karl Feininger and American singer Elizabeth Feininger. He spent his childhood in New York City and became interested in art at a young age. Although born in New York, Lyonel Feininger lived and worked mostly in Germany.

In 1887 Feininger's parents took him to Germany to study violin, but he began taking drawing classes at the Hamburg Kunstgewerbeschule (College of Arts and Crafts) and subsequently moved to Berlin to study art at the Königliche Akademie under Ernst Hancke. During this time he met and befriended a fellow art student, Alfred Vance Churchill, who later became an art historian and curator. They would exchange letters and artwork for many years. For a brief time Feininger studied at the College St. Servais in Liège and with Filippo Colarossi in Paris, but returned to Berlin to study at the Akademie der Kunste with Karl Schlabitz.

Feininger's career as cartoonist started in 1894. He was working for several German, French and American magazines and illustrated two comic strips "The Kin-der-Kids" and "Wee Willie Winkie's World" for the Chicago Tribune. During this period he married Clara Fürst and they had two daughters, Lore and Marianne. He also exhibited drawings at the annual Berlin Secession and the Great Berlin Art Exhibition.

Feininger separated from his wife after starting an affair with Julia Borg. He and Julia traveled to Paris where he became greatly influenced by the French avant-garde. When they returned to Berlin in 1908, he gave up illustration in favor of painting. He and Julia were then married and they had three sons, Andreas, Laurence, and Theodore Lux.

Feininger became a member of the Berlin Secession and exhibited his paintings, primarily landscapes inspired by French cubism. Around 1912, Feininger became affiliated with the German expressionist groups Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter, and the Novembergruppe in 1918, where he met Walter Gropius. When Gropius established the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany in 1919, Feininger became the master artist in charge of the printmaking workshop. He taught there and continued to develop his painting, and in 1925 he formed the Blue Four with Alexei Jawlensky, Paul Klee, and Vasily Kandinsky. When the Bauhaus moved to Dessau in 1926 he became an artist-in-residence and stayed there until it closed in 1933.

After the Nazi's declared Feininger's work "degenerate" in 1937, he moved to California where he taught at Mills College. He settled permanently in New York and had great success exhibiting his work in the United States, which culminated in a joint retrospective in 1944 with Marsden Hartley. Lyonel Feininger died in 1956 at the age of 84.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art also has several collections related to Lyonel Feininger, including Letters to Beatrice Lippincott (Garvan) from Lyonel and Julia Feininger available on microfilm reel 4909, and a 1939 letter from Feininger to Alfred Neumeyer, available on reel 2804. The archives also has additional collections of loaned papers available only on microfilm: Lyonel Feininger papers loaned for microfilming by Feininger's friend, H. Francis Kortheuer and available on reel D5 and D29, and Sketches by Feininger loaned for microfilming by Fred Werner and available on reel D5.

The most complete Lyonel Feininger Archive, donated by the Feininger family, is located at Harvard University. The Alfred Vance Churchill papers, 1828-1948, are located at Smith College Archives.
Separated Material:
The Alfred Vance Churchill papers regarding Lyonel Feininger included approximately 23 photographs of works of art by Feininger. These items were removed from the collection upon receipt and added to Photographs of Works of Art, Collection One, and microfilmed on reel 468.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1956 by Mrs. Alfred (Marie) Churchill.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Alfred Vance Churchill papers regarding Lyonel Feininger are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Graphic arts -- Germany  Search this
Painters -- Germany  Search this
Cartoonists -- Germany  Search this
Graphic artists -- United States  Search this
Cartooning -- United States  Search this
Graphic arts -- United States  Search this
Cartooning -- Germany  Search this
Expressionism (Art) -- Germany  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Germany  Search this
Printmakers -- Germany  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Alfred Vance Churchill papers regarding Lyonel Feininger, 1888-1944. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.churalfr
See more items in:
Alfred Vance Churchill papers regarding Lyonel Feininger
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-churalfr
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