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Apollo 11 Recovery

Creator:
National Air and Space Museum
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2009-06-16T14:33:43.000Z
Topic:
Aeronautics
Flight
Space Sciences
Youtube Category:
Education
Video Title:
Apollo 11 Recovery
Description:
Apollo 11 astronauts exit command module wearing biological isolation garments and await helicopter recovery. NASA Video
Views:
38,485
Video Duration:
43 sec
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airandspace
YouTube Channel:
airandspace
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Apollo 11 Launch: Photographed

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2010-02-23T18:36:43.000Z
Youtube Category:
Education
Video Title:
Apollo 11 Launch: Photographed
Description:
Read more at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/We-Have-Liftoff.html Photographer David Burnett focused his camera on the many tourists who flocked to Florida in 1969 to watch the launch of Apollo 11 (Produced by Molly Roberts; Photographs by David Burnett/Contact Press Images).
Views:
962
Video Duration:
3 min 51 sec
See more by:
SmithsonianMagazine
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianMagazine
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
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Button, Apollo 11

Materials:
Steel
Plastic
Synthetic Fabric
Copper Alloy
Ink
Dimensions:
3-D (Button): 15.9 × 4.4 × 0.6cm (6 1/4 × 1 3/4 × 1/4 in.)
Storage: 21.6 × 8.9 × 3.8cm (8 1/2 × 3 1/2 × 1 1/2 in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Events
Country of Origin:
United States
Credit Line:
Gift of Timothy Connelly
Inventory Number:
A20050481000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This button and ribbon celebrate the Apollo 11 lunar landing on July 20, 1969. On that date, NASA astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin walked on the Moon's surface while Michael Collins orbited above in the command module. Buttons like this one were sold and collected as souvenirs of the event. Timothy Connelly donated this button and ribbon collected by his father, an avid button collector, to the National Collection in 2005.
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Button, Apollo 11

Materials:
Steel
Plastic
Synthetic Fabric
Copper Alloy
Ink
Dimensions:
3-D (Button): 13 × 13 × 0.6cm (5 1/8 × 5 1/8 × 1/4 in.)
Storage: 19.1 × 10.2 × 3.8cm (7 1/2 × 4 × 1 1/2 in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Events
Country of Origin:
United States
Credit Line:
Gift of Timothy Connelly
Inventory Number:
A20050482000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This button and ribbon celebrated the Apollo 11 lunar landing on July 20, 1969. On that date, NASA astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz"Aldrin walked on the Moon's surface while Michael Collins orbited in the command module. Although the mission was also celebrated as a universal human achievement, this button celebrates the feat as a uniquely American one. Timothy Connelly donated this button, collected by his father, an avid button collector, to the National Collection in 2005.
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National Air and Space Museum Collection
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National Air and Space Museum
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Penlight, Apollo 11

Manufacturer:
ACR Electronics Corporation
Materials:
Overall: Brass, glass
Dimensions:
3-D: 12.7 × 2.5cm (5 × 1 in.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Miscellaneous
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from NASA - Johnson Space Center
Inventory Number:
A19850142000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This small flashlight was part of the astronaut equipment available to the Apollo 11 crew on their July 1969 mission to the Moon.
It is constructed with a brass case, and was operated by rotating the bulb end. It was powered by a small battery and had a small velcro tab to keep it secure in the weightless environment.
Michael Collins donated this to the National Air and Space Museum in 1985.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Penlight, Apollo 11

Manufacturer:
ACR Electronics Corporation
Materials:
Brass, Velcro
Interior: Chrome reflector, light bulb
Dimensions:
3-D: 13.3 x 1.6cm (5 1/4 x 5/8 in.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Accessories
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19791754000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This small flashlight, built by the ACR Electronics Corporation, was part of the emergency tool kit for use in the command module during the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969.
Constructed of brass, it was powered by a small battery, and operated by rotating the bulb end.
Transferred to the National Air and Space Museum from NASA in 1979
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, VA
Exhibit Station:
Human Spaceflight
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Chronograph, Armstrong, Apollo 11

Title: Chronograph, Armstrong, Apollo 11
Astronaut:
Neil Armstrong, August 5, 1930--August 25, 2012
Manufacturer:
Omega Watch Co.
Materials:
Case: Stainless steel
Lens: Hesalite (synthetic crystal)
Interior mechanism: Brass, stainless steel, jewels
Dimensions:
3-D: 5.1 x 3.8 x 1.3cm (2 x 1 1/2 x 1/2 in.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Accessories
Country of Origin:
Switzerland
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19731247000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
NASA issued this Omega Speedmaster chronograph to astronaut Neil Armstrong for use during the Apollo 11 mission of July 1969.
Selected after a series of rigorous tests demonstrated its high level of precision and reliability, the Speedmaster chronograph was chosen by NASA for the U.S. space program in 1964. Program requirements called for a manual-winding wrist chronograph that was water-proof, shock-proof, anti-magnetic, able to withstand temperatures ranging from 0 to 200 degrees Farenheit, and accelerations of up to 12 g's. NASA first certified the Omega Speedmaster as the chronograph for the Gemini program and made successive purchases for both the Apollo and the Skylab/ASTP missions.
Transferred from NASA in 1973.
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Checklist, Operations, Apollo 11

Title: Checklist Operations, Apollo 11
Astronaut:
Michael Collins
Manufacturer:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Materials:
Paper
Ink
Steel
Chrome Plating
Velcro
Adhesive
Dimensions:
3-D (Closed): 18 × 4 × 20.6cm (7 1/16 × 1 9/16 × 8 1/8 in.)
Type:
EQUIPMENT-Mission Support
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Donated by Mr. Michael Collins
Inventory Number:
A19850133000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This is the Command Module Operations checklist used by astronaut and Command Module Pilot, Michael Collins, on Apollo 11 in July 1969.
Checklists were an important part of the equipment assigned to the spacecraft, and enabled the astronauts to perform their tasks in a consistent and orderly way, while at the same time ensuring that no steps were missed or overlooked.
This checklist was donated to the National Air and Space Museum by Michael Collins in 1985.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Hatch, Crew, Apollo 11

Title: Hatch, Crew, Apollo 11
Manufacturer:
Rockwell International Corporation
Materials:
Metal, glass
Dimensions:
Overall: 2 ft. 5 1/2 in. tall x 3 ft. 3 3/8 in. wide x 10 5/8 in. deep (75 x 100 x 27cm)
Other (Window): 10 5/8 in. diameter (27cm)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Manned-Parts & Structural Components
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the NASA-Johnson Space Center
Inventory Number:
A19791810000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This hatch was the main crew hatch on "Columbia" (CM-107), the Command Module flown on the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The Apollo hatch had to provide a perfect seal for proper cabin pressurization, thermal protection during re-entry, and water-tight conditions during splashdown and recovery. An example of the "unified hatch" designed following the fatal Apollo 204 fire in January 1967, the Apollo 11 hatch covered the side opening in both the pressurized cabin and the external heat shield that covered the spacecraft.
The hatch was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution by the NASA Johnson Space Center in 1970.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Pen, Marker, Apollo 11

Manufacturer:
NASA Ames Research Center
Materials:
Overall - brushed aluminum
Dimensions:
Overall: 13.3 × 1cm (5 1/4 × 3/8 in., 1/16lb.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Miscellaneous
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from NASA
Inventory Number:
A19980076000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This "Rocket" model felt-tipped marker was carried by astronauts on the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969. NASA purchased a number of these markers from the Duro Pen Company for use by astronauts during the Apollo and Skylab program. It is constructed with a chrome body and typical "felt" tip. It also has a small velcro tab attached to keep it secure in the weightless environment.
NASA transferred this pen to the Museum in 1971.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Penlight, Aldrin, Apollo 11

Manufacturer:
ACR Electronics Corporation
Materials:
Copper Alloy
Glass
Velcro
Plastic
Lightbulb
Paint
Dimensions:
3-D: 13 x 2.7cm (5 1/8 x 1 1/16 in.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Accessories
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from NASA - Johnson Space Center
Inventory Number:
A19791735000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This small brass flashlight was part of the equipment assigned to Buzz Aldrin for use in the Lunar Module during the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969.
Transferred to the National Air and Space Museum from NASA in 1977.
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National Air and Space Museum Collection
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National Air and Space Museum
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Scissors, Surgical, Apollo 11

Astronaut:
Michael Collins
Manufacturer:
Weck
Materials:
Overall: Chrome-plated steel
Dimensions:
3-D: 17.8 x 5.1cm (7 x 2 in.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Food & Food Accessories
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Donated by Michael Collins
Inventory Number:
A19850144000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
These scissors were part of the Personal Preference Kit of Command Module Pilot Michael Collins during the Apollo 11 mission in July 1969. They were used to open the plastic bags in which food was rehydrated, to enable the astronauts to eat and reduce the danger of spillage.
Donated to the National Air and Space Museum by Michael Collins in 1984
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Sunglasses, Collins, Apollo 11

Manufacturer:
American Optical Co.
Astronaut:
Michael Collins
Materials:
Rims - metal
lenses - glass
Dimensions:
3-D: 10.2 x 1.9cm (4 x 3/4 in.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Personal Items
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Donated by Michael Collins
Inventory Number:
A19850145000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
These sunglasses were issued to astronaut Michael Collins, Command Module pilot of the Apollo 11 mission in July, 1969, as part of the personal equipment carried by each astronaut.
Donated to the National Air and Space Museum by Michael Collins in 1984
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Toothbrush, Collins, Apollo 11

Manufacturer:
Lactona
Astronaut:
Michael Collins
Materials:
Plastic, synthetic fibers, rubber
Dimensions:
Overall: 6 in. long (15.2cm)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Hygiene & Waste Management
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Donated by Michael Collins
Inventory Number:
A19850147000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This toothbrush, made by Lactona, was carried aboard the Apollo 11 mission by astronaut Michael Collins as part of his Personal Preference Kit.
The Personal Preference Kit was so named because all astronauts were permitted one small bag for personal or small items of significance they wished to carry into space.
Donated to the National Air and Space Museum by Michael Collins in 1984
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Exerciser, Inflight, Apollo 11

Manufacturer:
Exer-Genie, Inc.
Materials:
Straps: Polyester webbing
Handle: Aluminum
Dimensions:
3-D: 126 × 4.5cm (49 5/8 in. × 1 3/4 in.)
Type:
EQUIPMENT-Medical
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from NASA
Inventory Number:
A19980021000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This inflight exerciser was designed to stretch and exercise the muscles of the Apollo 11 astronauts during their mission in July 1969.
Muscle retention and tone is lost quickly in gravity-free space if the muscles are not exercised on a regular basis.
Transferred to NASM from NASA - Johnson Space Center in 1973
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Ampule, Buffer, Apollo 11

Title: Ampule, Buffer, Apollo 11
Manufacturer:
Unknown
Materials:
Exterior: Hard-case Teflon
Contents: sodium dihydrogen phosphate
Dimensions:
3-D: 7.6 x 3.2cm (3 x 1 1/4 in.)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Manned-Life Support
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the NASA - Johnson Space Center
Inventory Number:
A19700102152
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
To insure that drinking water during the Apollo missions did not become contaminated with microorganisms, chemical disinfectants were periodically injected into the water supply by the astronauts. A chlorine solution was used for the Command Module. The chlorine (sodium hypochlorite diluted to 1860 mg/L) was contained in 20 cc cylindrical ampules. 20 minutes before water was consumed, the ampule was inserted into the water tank. Immediately afterward, a second ampule, like this one, containing a buffer (sodium dihydrogen phosphate), to neutralize the pH of the water, and an inhibitor (sodium nitrate), to slow corrosion, was inserted. After waiting the 20 additional minutes for the chemicals to disperse throughout the tank, the water was potable.
This buffer ampule was flown on Apollo 11 Command Module and was returned unused. It was transferred from NASA to the Smithsonian along with the rest of the contents of the Command Module in 1970.
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National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Ampule, Chlorine, Apollo 11

Title: Ampule, Chlorine, Apollo 11
Materials:
Sodium hypochlorite; plastic container
Dimensions:
3-D: 7.9 x 3.6cm (3 1/8 x 1 7/16 in.)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Manned-Life Support
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the NASA - Johnson Space Center
Inventory Number:
A19980063000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
To insure that drinking water during the Apollo missions did not become contaminated with microorganisms, chemical disinfectants were periodically injected into the water supply by the astronauts. A chlorine solution was used for the Command Module. The cholrine (sodium hypochlorite diluted to 1860 mg/L) was contained in 20 cc cylindrical ampules, like this one. Twenty minutes before water was consumed, the ampule was inserted into the water tank. Immediately afterward, a second ampule, containing a buffer (sodium dihydrogen phosphate) was inserted to neutralize the pH of the water, with and inhibitor, sodium nitrate (to slow corrosion). After waiting the 20 additional minutes for the chemicals to disperse throughout the tank, the water was potable.
This ampule was flown on Apollo 11 Command Module and was returned unused. In 1970 NASA transferred it to the Smithsonian along with the rest of the contents of the Command Module.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Patch, Mission, Apollo 11

Materials:
Synthetic Fabric
Dimensions:
3-D (Patch): 10.2 × 0.2cm (4 × 1/16 in.)
Storage: 17.8 × 15.2 × 0.6cm (7 × 6 × 1/4 in.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Events
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Gift of Mance Clayton
Inventory Number:
A19820401000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This is a commercial copy of the Apollo 11 mission patch. Apollo 11 was launched on July 16, 1969, and returned after a little over eight days carrying Neil Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr., and Michael Collins. It was the fifth human spaceflight and the first piloted lunar landing in the Apollo program. Over 500 million people around the world watched Neil Armstrong's televised image and heard his voice as he took his first step on the Moon on July 20.
The symbolism of this patch depicts an American bald eagle, holding olive branches representing peace, landing on the lunar surface, with the Earth above in the background. The lunar module carrying Armstrong and Aldrin was named "Eagle."
This replica was made for commercial sale. Mance Clayton donated it to the National Collection in 1982.
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National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Command Module, Apollo 11

Title: Command Module, Apollo 11
Astronaut:
Buzz Aldrin
Michael Collins
Neil Armstrong, August 5, 1930--August 25, 2012
Manufacturer:
North American Rockwell
Materials:
Primary Materials: Aluminum alloy, Stainless steel, Titanium
Dimensions:
Overall: 10 ft. 7 in. × 12 ft. 10 in., 11700lb. (322.6 × 391.2cm, 5307.1kg)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Manned
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19700102000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
The Apollo 11 Command Module, "Columbia," was the living quarters for the three-person crew during most of the first manned lunar landing mission in July 1969. On July 16, 1969, Neil Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin and Michael Collins were launched from Cape Kennedy atop a Saturn V rocket. This Command Module, no. 107, manufactured by North American Rockwell, was one of three parts of the complete Apollo spacecraft. The other two parts were the Service Module and the Lunar Module, nicknamed "Eagle." The Service Module contained the main spacecraft propulsion system and consumables while the Lunar Module was the two-person craft used by Armstrong and Aldrin to descend to the Moon's surface on July 20. The Command Module is the only portion of the spacecraft to return to Earth.
It was transferred to the Smithsonian in 1970 following a NASA-sponsored tour of American cities. The Apollo CM Columbia has been designated a "Milestone of Flight" by the Museum.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Cuff Links, Apollo 11

Astronaut:
Michael Collins
Manufacturer:
Unknown
Materials:
Overall: Gold, enamel, pearl
Dimensions:
3-D (Each): 1.9 x 1.3 x 1.9cm (3/4 x 1/2 x 3/4 in.)
Type:
PERSONAL EQUIPMENT-Personal Items
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Donated by Michael Collins
Inventory Number:
A19850138000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
These Apollo command module cufflinks are part of a commemorative set that includes a matching tie-tack belonging to NASA astronaut Michael Collins. On July 20, 1969, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin became the first human beings to walk on the lunar surface while Collins orbited the Moon in the Apollo 11 command module.
When Collins became the director of the National Air and Space Museum, he loaned these cufflinks to the Museum for display in the "Apollo to the Moon" gallery. He gave the cufflinks and tie tac to the National Collection as permanent donations in 1984.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Apollo to the Moon
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
Visitor Tag(s):

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