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Historic resources in African-American neighborhoods of Piedmont Georgia / by Sara Orton Glickman

Author:
Glickman, Sara Orton  Search this
Physical description:
vi, 87 leaves : ill., maps, plans ; 29 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Georgia
Date:
1999
1986
Topic:
African American architecture--Conservation and restoration  Search this
Call number:
NA738.N5 G55 1986a
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_558760

James Tinsley, young Henrietta Brown, and Neil Harris standing in front of a house

Collection Creator:
Harris, Chester Lee  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photographic print , gelatin silver, 3 x 4 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Place:
United States
Scope and Contents:
Grandmother of Lee Harris, Henrietta "Nana" Cephas Brown, and her acquaintances. Description written on back.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Lee Harris papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Collection Citation:
The Lee Harris papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Mr. Chester Lee Harris.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-034, Item ACMA PH2003.7078.67
See more items in:
Chester Lee Harris papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-034-ref582

Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film

Creator:
Anderson, Harold M.  Search this
Names:
Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969  Search this
Nixon, Pat, 1912-  Search this
Nixon, Richard M.  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (1 reel.)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Motion pictures (visual works)
Place:
Oklahoma -- Tulsa
Date:
1948-1952
Summary:
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street Film documents many of the neighborhood's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. Reverand Andserson also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.
Scope and Contents:
A black and white, silent 16mm film documenting the people and businesses of the Black Wall Street section of Tulsa, Oklahoma from 1948-1952.
Arrangement:
Arranged in one series.

Series 1, Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film
Biographical / Historical:
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community that was destroyed during a race riot that broke out in 1921. Its businesses were burned to the ground and the residents were displaced. Against the odds, Black Wall Street was reborn and by the 1940s was once again a center for African American life in Tulsa.

Reverend Harold Mose Anderson's film titled Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street documents evidence of this resurgance. Although Anderson was only a year old when the riots occurred, he grew up hearing stories about life in Black Wall Street before the riot. He was both a witness to and participant in the rebuilding and revival of the community. And, he documented the resulting renewal with his 16mm motion picture camera.

Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street does just that. A successful businessman, Anderson managed and then owned two neighborhood movie theaters, a skating rink, bowling alley, and shopping strip, among other enterprises. He also brought the Golden Gloves boxing tournament to the area, making it accessible to African American fans. Anderson felt that it was critical that Black Wall Street sustain independent African American business, ensuring resident dollars would stay in the community and guarantee its vibrancy.

Almost lost in a devastating house fire, Reverend Anderson's film recognizes the efforts and successes of the community. With his camera he documented many of Black Wall Street's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. He also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center by Patricia Sanders on behalf of the heirs of Harold M. Anderson in 2009.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment. Reference copy in Smithsonian Institution Digital Asset Management System (DAMS) must be used.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. All third party requests to use the film for other than standard museum purposes are to be direced to GettyImages. See repository for information.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Parades -- United States  Search this
Riots -- 1920-1930 -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa  Search this
African American businesspeople  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film, 1948-1952, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1197
See more items in:
Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1197

St. Petersburg's historic African American neighborhoods : community, culture, and connection / Jon Wilson and Rosalie Peck

Author:
Wilson, Jon 1945-  Search this
Peck, Rosalie  Search this
Physical description:
126 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Biography
History
Place:
Florida
Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg (Fla.)
Date:
2008
Topic:
African American neighborhoods--History  Search this
African Americans--History  Search this
Historic sites  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Community life--History  Search this
African Americans--Social life and customs  Search this
Oral history  Search this
History  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1100009

Henry Bazemore collection of Frederick Douglass Dwellings photographs

Creator:
Bazemore, Henry  Search this
Extent:
0.42 Linear feet ((1 box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Photographs
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
circa 1940s
Summary:
The collection, dated circa 1940s and measuring .42 linear feet, documents the lives and activities of the residents of the Frederick Douglass Dwellings. The collection is comprised of black-and-white photographs.
Biographical/Historical note:
Built as temporary housing for World War II workers, the Frederick Douglass Dwellings were located on land previously owned by Tobias Henson, a former slave, who, after purchasing his freedom and that of his family, purchased and developed a 24-acre tract called The Ridge. Henson added to his landholdings and by the 1870s his family was the principal landholder in the black community of Stantontown; they remained on the land until the 1940s, when the federal government condemned the community to build the Frederick Douglass Dwellings. Deemed uninhabitable in 1998 and left vacant, the Frederick Douglass Dwellings were demolished in 2000 to make way for a new mixed-income community.
Restrictions:
Use of materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Public housing  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs
Citation:
Henry Bazemore collection of Frederick Douglass Dwellings photographs, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Henry Bazemore.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-067
See more items in:
Henry Bazemore collection of Frederick Douglass Dwellings photographs
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-067
Additional Online Media:

Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
15.25 Linear feet (26 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Exhibition catalogs
Maps
Clippings
Photographic prints
Contact sheets
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
circa 1977-1978
Summary:
An exhibition on history of the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D. C. The show was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from March of 1977 to March 1978. Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, posters, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Maps
Clippings
Photographic prints
Contact sheets
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Correspondence
Citation:
Anacostia story: 1680-1930 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-039
See more items in:
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-039
Additional Online Media:

Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE

Creator:
McGrath, Dorn C., Jr.  Search this
Anacostia Coordinating Council  Search this
George Washington University  Search this
Collection Creator:
McGrath, Dorn C., Jr.  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col., 2 x 2 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1987
Scope and Contents:
This image was taken during the 1987 survey of Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE in Washington, D.C., for the Historic Anacostia Revitalization Project, a survey of all buildings in the Anacostia Historic District.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Dorn C. McGrath, Jr. slides and other material are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Commercial buildings  Search this
Historic districts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Dorn C. McGrath, Jr. slides and other material, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Dorn C. McGrath, Jr.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-059, Item ACMA McGrath_016
See more items in:
Dorn C. McGrath, Jr. slides and other material
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-059-ref590

East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2.75 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Clippings
Maps
Exhibition catalogs
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
2007 - 2008
Summary:
An exhibition to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Anacostia Community Museum, formerly known as the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, organized by the museum and held there September 15, 2007 through November 9, 2008. The exhibit explored the development of community life of neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River, beginning with the original inhabitation by Native Americans up to the present.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include research files, compact disc, and photo copies.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Clippings
Maps
Exhibition catalogs
Citation:
East of the River: Continuity and Change exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-052
See more items in:
East of the River: Continuity and Change Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-052
Additional Online Media:

Anacostia: Not the Same Old Story exhibition records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Lucy Ellen Moton  Search this
Extent:
0.29 Linear feet (1 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Exhibition records
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Photographic prints
Clippings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1995
Summary:
Held at the Anacostia Museum from June 17, 1995 to August 28, 1995, this exhibition was the result of a partnership between the museum and Lucy Ellen Moton Elementary School. During the 1994-95 school years, the students researched the community of Anacostia and produced photographs, poems, stories, drawings, interviews, documents, and personal artifacts. The student efforts were included under the themes: Moten Elementary School, From Our Homes, Institutions and Organizations, and Community Life.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, exhibit layouts, and student statements.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Elementary schools  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Photographic prints
Clippings
Citation:
Anacostia: Not the Same Old Story exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-041
See more items in:
Anacostia: Not the Same Old Story exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-041

Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
North Brentwood Historical Society (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2.42 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Brochures
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1996-04 - 1996-12
Summary:
An exhibition on the North Brentwood neighborhood of Washington, DC. The show was created by the Anacostia Community Museum in collaboration with the North Brentwood Historical Society. It was exhibited at the museum from April 1996 to December 1996. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Brochures
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Citation:
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-019
See more items in:
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-019

Frederick Douglass Dwellings Collection

Extent:
1.5 Linear feet ((3 boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Magazines (periodicals)
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Black-and-white photographs
Clippings
Color photographs
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1940s-1990s
Summary:
The collection, which dates from circa 1940s to 1990s and measures 1.15 linear feet, documents the daily lives and activities of the residents of the Frederick Douglass Dwellings and other areas of Anacostia, as well as the demolition of the Frederick Douglass Dwellings. The collection is comprised of color and black-and-white photographs, studio portraits, slides, negatives, documents from community organizations, magazines and clippings.
Biographical/Historical note:
Built as temporary housing for World War II workers, the Frederick Douglass Dwellings were located on land previously owned by Tobias Henson, a former slave, who, after purchasing his freedom and that of his family, purchased and developed a 24-acre tract called The Ridge. Henson added to his landholdings and by the 1870s his family was the principal landholder in the black community of Stantontown; they remained on the land until the 1940s, when the federal government condemned the community to build the Frederick Douglass Dwellings. Deemed uninhabitable in 1998 and left vacant, the Frederick Douglass Dwellings were demolished in 2000 to make way for a new mixed-income community.
Restrictions:
Use of materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Public housing  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Magazines (periodicals) -- 20th century
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Black-and-white photographs
Clippings
Color photographs
Citation:
Frederick Douglass Dwellings collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of members of the Southeast Voices.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-066
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-066

Percival Bryan collection

Creator:
Bryan, Percival  Search this
Names:
Anderson, Marian, 1897-1993  Search this
Bryan, Percival  Search this
Cummings, Homer S. (Homer Stillé), 1870-1956  Search this
Extent:
5.94 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Autograph albums
Memorabilia
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1932-1993
bulk 1942-1980
Summary:
The collection, which dates from 1932 to 1993 and measures 5.94 linear feet, documents the career and personal life of Washington, DC cabdriver Percival Bryan. The collection is comprised of an autobiography, autograph books, citations, correspondence, memorabilia, photographic prints, and printed materials.
Arrangement note:
The papers are organized into five series. The Photographs series has been further arranged into subseries. The contents of each series and subseries are arranged alphabetically. There are oversize materials in the Biographical and Photographs series. The series and subseries are arranged as follows:

Series 1: Autobiographical

Series 2: Biographical

Series 3: Autograph albums

Series 4 Memorabilia

Series 5: Photographs

Subseries 5.1: Portraits

Subseries 5.2: Bryans and friends

Subseries 5.3: Special events

Subseries 5.4: Social groups

Subseries 5.5: Travel and recreation

Subseries 5.6: Miscellaneous
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in Galena, St. Mary's Parish, Jamaica, Percival Bryan (1906--996) came to the United States in 1924 as a stowaway in search of adventure and opportunity. He settled in the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D.C., involved himself with various social and civic organizations, and was instrumental in forming the Caribbean American Inter-cultural Organization. He worked as a White House butler under Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882--945), Harry S. Truman (1884--972), and Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890--969). Bryan also served as a chauffer for Attorney General Homer S. Cummings (1870--956) before becoming a cab driver. An autograph collector, Mr. Bryan collected over 100,000 signatures of notable individuals.
Separated Materials note:
Three-dimensional items located in the objects collection.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Taxicab drivers  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Jamaican Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Autograph albums
Memorabilia -- 20th century
Citation:
Percival Bryan collection, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Rose Dyke.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-001
See more items in:
Percival Bryan collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-001
Additional Online Media:

Ruth Marie Hudson photographic prints

Creator:
Hudson, Ruth Marie.  Search this
Extent:
9 negatives (photographic)
19 Photographic prints
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Eustis (Fla.)
Date:
circa 1930
Summary:
This collection, which dates from circa 1930, contains 19 black-and-white photographic prints and 9 black-and-white negatives depicting the family of Mrs. Ruth Marie Hudson, as well as the black community in Eustis, Florida. The images portray African American men, women and children.
Biographical/Historical note:
The city of Eustis is located in Lake County, Florida. Traditionally African-American neighborhoods in the city include Egypt and East Town. In 2009, the City of Eustis received a grant from the Florida Division of Historical Resources to complete a historical and architectural survey of the two neighborhoods.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Ruth Marie Hudson photographic prints, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Patricia N. George.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-036
See more items in:
Ruth Marie Hudson photographic prints
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-036

What if walls created spaces?

Artist:
Ruben Ochoa, born Oceanside, CA 1974  Search this
Medium:
lenticular print mounted on aluminum composite
Dimensions:
overall: 48 × 96 in. (121.9 × 243.8 cm)
Type:
Photography
Date:
2007
Topic:
Architecture Exterior\detail\wall  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Smithsonian Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center
Object number:
2015.42A-D
Restrictions & Rights:
© 2007, Ruben Ochoa
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Graphic Arts
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_2015.42A-D

Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
2.26 Cubic feet (1 box, 1 oversized box.)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1898-1988
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition presented by the Anacostia Community Museum measure 2.26 cubic feet and date from 1898 to 1988. Included are exhibit administrative files, lists of images, press releases for the promotion of the exhibit, oral history transcripts and permission forms, and extensive research files into the Anacostia community in southeast Washington D.C.

Exhibit Records include an outline for exhibit themes and proposed layouts, administrative files that include work plans and meeting notes, lists of exhibit images, promotional press releases, and related correspondence. Subjects relate to project management and community engagement.

Oral History of Anacostia Project Files include transcripts of the audio collected from the Oral History of Anacostia Project. This includes a list of interviewees and their interviewers.

Neighborhood Background Research Files represent two-thirds of the collection. Research files include news clippings, publications, unpublished articles, project files, and research material. Subjects include local figures and the Barry's Farm neighborhood, unpublished historical narratives, and project records related to archaeological investigations and neighborhood development programs.
Arrangement:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records is arranged in 3 series.

Series 1: Exhibit Records

Series 2: Oral History of Anacostia Project Files

Series 3: Neighborhood Background Research Files
Historical Note:
An exhibition on history of the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington D.C. post-World War II. The show was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum) and held there from January 1, 1972 to December 31, 1977.
Related Materials:
Anacostia Story: 1608-1930 Exhibition Records, M03-039.
Provenance:
Records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition were created by the Anacostia Community Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-040
Additional Online Media:

Anacostia Historical Society records

Creator:
Anacostia Historical Society  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Historical Society  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Extent:
1.65 Linear feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Exhibition catalogs
Correspondence
Financial records
Slides (photographs)
Newsletters
Clippings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1974-1992
bulk 1977-1980
Summary:
The Anacostia Historical Society records, which date from 1974 to 1992, document the history and activities of the Anacostia Historical Society. The records are comprised of correspondence, financial records, museum catalogs, newsletters, clippings and slides.
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the activities of the Anacostia Historical Society between 1974 and 1992. It contains material related to the Society's administration, events, and membership. Included in the collection are administrative and financial records, correspondence, mailing lists, membership records, and printed materials.
Arrangement:
The records are organized into six series. The Administration, Printed Materials, and Special Events series have been further arranged into subseries. The Printed Materials series is arranged chronologically; otherwise the content of each series and subseries is arranged alphabetically. The series are arranged as follows:

Series I: Administration, 1974-1992, contains materials related to the management and organization of the Anacostia Historical Society (AHS). The documents in this series include dues statements, meeting agendas and minutes, and membership lists. The meeting agendas and minutes present a comprehensive view of the scope of the Socety's political and social efforts on ehalf of the Anacostia community.

Series II: Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, 1975-1990, contains information on the Anacostia Neighborbood Museum's administration, events, and exhibits. The materials include administrative papers, event calendars, fliers, and membership documents. There are extensive records on the planning for the Museum's 10th Anniversary celebration and on the Anacostia Story 1608/1930 exhibit, which was developed in collaboration with the Anacostia Historical Society.

Series III: Correspondence, 1975-1985, is comprised of the Society's correspondence with its members, political representatives, and the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum. Also included in this series is correspondence generated by Alice Bell Finlayson in her effort to prevent the demolition of Birney School, where she served as principal for fourteen years.

Series IV: Printed Materials, 1975-1992, contains newspaper clipping, newsletters, and museum materials, which provide information on Anacostia's history and culture The materials include the Anacostia Historical Society's newsletters.

Series V: Slides, 1970-1974, contain color slides. Some of the images are from the San Francisco region and include pictures of the Market Street area of the city.

Series VI: Special Events, 1977-1987, contains materials related to enrchment events sponsored by the Society. Included are curriculum vitae and speeches from the lecture series, and general information on excursions to historical sites.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Anacostia Historical Society ws established in 1974 to serve as "an organization of Anacostia residents and a committee of the Board of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum...dedicated to the collection, preservation and understanding of its community's rich history and heritage." To this end, the coalition developed programs that provided opportunities for the entire city to learn more about the area. In 1977, this collaboration produced The Anacostia Story: 1608-1930, an exhibit which presented an expansive chronicle of life in the Anacostia area. The same year, with funding from the Smithsonian Institution and a grant from the D.C. Commmunity Humanities Council, the Society established a lecture series that addressed important issues in the community. Speakers included academicians, politicians, activists and community leaders. The Society continued its work through the 1990s; however, its records show a drop in participation and program events in the early 1980s. The latest indication of organizational activity is a meeting attendance sheet dated April 8, 1922, which indicates 6 members attended.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions may exist. Please contact the archivist for further information.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
History -- societies, etc  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Correspondence
Financial records
Slides (photographs)
Newsletters
Clippings
Citation:
Anacostia Historical Society records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Anacostia Historical Society.
Identifier:
ACMA.M04-001
See more items in:
Anacostia Historical Society records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-m04-001

Alice Bell Finlayson papers

Creator:
Finlayson, Alice Bell  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge  Search this
New York University. School of Education  Search this
Public Schools of the District of Columbia  Search this
Finlayson, Alice Bell  Search this
Extent:
5.16 Linear feet (7 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Scrapbooks
Books
Photographic prints
Periodicals
Photographs
Papers
Sketches
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1901-1992
bulk 1938-1972
Summary:
The Alice Bell Finlayson papers, which date from 1901 to 1990 and measure 5.16 linear feet, document the career of educator, community organizer, and journalist Alice Bell Finlayson. The papers are comprised of books, correspondence, curriculum vitae, documents from community organizations, journals, magazines newspaper clippings, photographs, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the life of Alice Bell Finlayson between 1922 and 1990. It contains materials related to Mrs. Finlayson's employment and community service. Included in the collection are academic writings, books, correspondence, curriculum, personnel records, photographs, and printed materials.
Arrangement note:
The papers are organized into six series. The Biographical and Printed Materials series are further arranged into subseries. The content of each series is arranged alphabetically. The series are arranged as follows:

Series 1: Biographical

Subseries 1.1: Autobiographical

Subseries 1.2: Education

Subseries 1.3: Employment

Series 2: Community Organizations

Series 3: Correspondence

Series 4: Photographs

Series 5: Printed material

Subseries 5.1: Books

Subseries 5.2: Government publications

Subseries 5.3: Journal Articles

Subseries 5.4: Museum catalogs and curriculum

Series 6: Miscellaneous
Biographical/Historical note:
Alice Bell Finlayson was born in Washington, DC in 1902. She attended Paul Lawrence Dunbar High School, and in 1922, she graduated from Miner Teachers College. She went on to earn a bachelor's and a master's degree in sociology from Howard University. While pursuing her degrees she began working for the District of Columbia Public Schools. In 1922 she took a position as a 1st grade teacher at the Garrison-Cleveland School.

For fourteen of her thirty-seven years with the District of Columbia Public Schools she served as principal of James G. Birney Elementary School. During her tenure at Birney she implemented several special programs designed to improve student outcomes. These programs addressed the needs of general education, gifted, and special education students. Students participated in reading and arts programs, as well as programs designed to promote healthy living and cultural awareness. Special education students developed life skills by working in building maintenance, and by providing other support services to the school. Mrs. Finlayson also established a research division within the school to develop testing instruments. As a result of these innovations, Birney became a training school for new teachers. Moreover, the District's Board of Education implemented some of the Birney programs district-wide. The school also won three Freedoms Foundation awards.

Mrs. Finlayson resigned as principal in January of 1959 and went on to hold other employment. She was a lecturer at Morgan State University, a program assistant at Howard University, and coordinator for several community programs. Beyond her regular employment she worked with various local and national civic organizations. She was a founding member of the Community Coordinating Organization, which was a coalition of District of Columbia community organizations. As chairman of the Women's Civic Guild she raised funds for community projects and for other organizations such as the NAACP. She was an active member of the community up until her death on November 27, 2000.
Related Archival Materials note:
Finding aid to the Anacostia Historical Society records located in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Finding aid to the Ella B. Howard Pearis papers located in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Finding aid to the Charles Qualls papers located in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Alice Bell Finlayson papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American educators  Search this
Community organization  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Scrapbooks
Books
Photographic prints
Periodicals
Photographs
Papers
Sketches
Citation:
Alice Bell Finlayson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-003
See more items in:
Alice Bell Finlayson papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-003

Harlem Renaissance Literature Collection

Extent:
3.4 Linear Feet ((37 books) (1 box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Books
Date:
circa 1901-1940
Summary:
This collection, which dates from circa 1901-1940, contains 37 books from African-American authors associated with the Harlem Renaissance. These materials were purchased in support of the exhibit "The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties" which was held at the Anacostia Community Museum from September 1985--December 1986.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Harlem Renaissance was a literary and artistic movement that reached its zenith during the 1920s. It was centered around the predominantly African-American neighborhood of Harlem in New York City and grew out of changes that had taken place in the African-American community since the end of slavery, including the Great Migration and World War I. The visual and literary art that emerged from this era encompassed a wide variety of cultural elements and styles, but was characterized by some common themes, including racial pride, the influence of the experience of slavery, and the effects of institutional racism.
Formatted Contents note:
From the heart of a folk; a book of songs -- The poet and other poems -- Plantation echoes; a collection of original Negro dialect poems -- The forged note : a romance of the darker races -- The Negro family in Chicago -- The book of American Negro spirituals [2 copies] -- Shakespeare in Harlem -- The Negro family in the United States -- Old fashioned Black fo'ks -- The weary blues -- Selected poems -- Seeking the best; dedicated to the Negro youth -- Native son -- Rope and faggot: a biography of Judge Lynch -- The fire in the flint -- Saint Peter relates an incident of the resurrection day -- Porgy; a play in four acts -- The voice of the Negro -- Flight [2 copies] -- Up from slavery; an autobiography -- Negro drawings -- Plays and pageants from the life of the Negro -- The green pastures -- The blacker the berry -- Tropic death -- Darkwater: voices from within the veil -- The Black Christ and other poems -- Copper sun -- Fine clothes to the Jew -- Tell my horse -- Une vie de toutes les couleurs -- Cordially yours ... a collection of original short stories and essays by America's leading authors -- Banjo, a story without a plot -- The Negro and his songs; a study of typical Negro songs in the South -- Color.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans in literature  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
African Americans -- Music  Search this
American literature -- African American authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Citation:
Harlem Renaissance literature collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-108
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-108

Henson Family Papers

Creator:
Henson family  Search this
Names:
Henson family  Search this
Henson, Tobias  Search this
Extent:
0.18 Linear feet (1 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Leaflets
Correspondence
Financial records
Newsletters
Account books
Receipts
Legal documents
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1818-1943
bulk 1830-1900
Summary:
The Henson Family papers, which date from 1818 to 1943 and measure 0.18 linear feet, document the activities of Tobias Henson and his descendants. The papers are comprised of booklets, correspondence, legal documents, and receipts.
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the activities of Tobias Henson and his descendants between 1818 and 1943. It contains materials related to the Hensons' financial and legal activities. Included in the collection are booklets, correspondence, deeds and titles, legal documents, and receipts.

Arrangement The papers are organized into four series. The content of each series is arranged alphabetically. The series are arranged as follows:

Series I: Financial Records Series II: Legal Records Series III: Printed Materials Series IV: Miscellaneous
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged by series: 1) Financial Records, 2) Legal Records, 3) Printed Materials, 4) Miscellaneous.
Biographical/Historical note:
The history of the Hensons begins with the family's patriarch, Tobias Henson. Mr. Henson was a slave in the Washington, DC area during the 18th and 19th centuries and, given his family's history, it is apparent that he was a man with an ambitious mission: to attain the American dream. He had two tasks to accomplish if he were to see his dream realized. First he had to gain freedom for himself and his family. Second he had to purchase property upon which he could build a home, and from which he could earn a living.

He took the first step in 1813 when he purchased himself from his slave master, thus gaining his freedom. Next he purchased his wife, Elizabeth. In April of 1832 Mr. Henson purchased his daughter Matlinda Smith and her three children. In May of the following year he purchased his second daughter Mary Anderson.

With these purchases, Tobias Henson became a slaveholder, with his wife and children his slaves. Ever resourceful, Mr. Henson used this to his advantage; he rented out his daughters for income and used them as collateral for loans. With the income he generated, he purchased the freedom of his other family members. In fact, he used his daughters, Matlinda and Mary, as collateral for a loan he acquired to purchase Mary's freedom.

In addition to purchasing his freedom in 1813, Tobias Henson entered into an agreement to buy land in the Anacostia section of Washington, DC. The land, named the Ridge, consisted of twenty-four acres located in the Congress Heights section of Anacostia. He made payments on the Ridge until 1826, at which time he made the final payment and became the legal owner. Initially Mr. Henson farmed the land, but as his family grew he subdivided the acreage so that the members of his family could experience their own American dream.

Over the subsequent decades members of the Henson family continued to purchase land in the area surrounding the Ridge; at one point they were one of the largest landowners in the Anacostia section of Washington, DC. The family maintained residence on various parts of the land from the time of its purchase until the middle of the 20th century. Title records filed with the District of Columbia show that, in 1931, the portion of the Ridge that Tobias Henson gave to his grandson, Richard Smith, was still in possession of his descendants. But that was the exception. Most of the Henson family's real estate was either sold or "taken" by the government under the auspices of eminent domain. Just a decade after this title was filed, the federal government made plans to take what remained of the Ridge.

The family did all they could to save the legacy of Tobias Henson. They contacted local and federal government officials in an attempt to stave off what would amount to the destruction of an important piece of black history dating from antebellum Washington, DC. When they had exhausted all of the possibilities, they made a last ditch appeal to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. In a 1943 letter they pleaded,

At the present there are some thirteen or fourteen families living on this land, which is still designated as the Ridge, and with only one or two exceptions, these families are the direct descendants of Tobian [sic] Henson…we do not feel that taking our homes will aid in the War Effort or in the Ideals of Democracy.

Unfortunately, their plea went unanswered; the land was taken by the government and the houses thereon where razed.
Related Materials:
Anacostia Historical Society Records.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Slavery -- United States  Search this
African American soldiers  Search this
Free blacks  Search this
African Education Society  Search this
American Colonization Society  Search this
Public housing  Search this
Eminent domain  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American families  Search this
Genre/Form:
Leaflets
Correspondence
Financial records
Newsletters
Account books
Receipts
Legal documents
Citation:
Henson family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Dr. Myrtle Henson.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-030
See more items in:
Henson Family Papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-030
Additional Online Media:

An Ohio City is Turning an Unused Highway Into a Pop-Up Forest

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 12 Jun 2017 11:52:53 +0000
Topic:
Search this
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_82844967b50cf13980e4e5f8e0452ccb

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