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Funeral Bier of Nasir al-Din Shah, Placed in the Takkiya Dawlat, Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 15.6 cm. x 20.7 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
May-June,1896
Topic:
Architecture
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15 02
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"Nasir al-Din shah (b. 1831-d. 1896), the fourth king of Qajar dynasty, was assassinated by Mirza Riza Kirmani on May 1st of 1896, on his short visit to Shah Abdul 'Azim Shrine in Shemiran, North of Tehran. The purpose of the trip was to celebrate the 50th anniversary of his reign. On April 30th of 1896, Kirmani, who was amongst the spectators of the Shah's visit to the Abd al-'Azim shrine - allowed for the first time in the presence of the Royal entourage - shot Nasir on his way out of the Shrine. Nasir al-Din shah's funeral was held on the 18th of Zi Gha'da of 1313 (May 1st, 1896) from Kakh-i Gulistan's Diamond room to Takkiya Dawlat. His body was kept in Takkiya Dawlat for a few months until his burial place was prepared. He was then buried beside his favorite wife - Furugh al-Saltana or Jayran - in Shah Abdul 'Azim. Another funeral was held upon his relocation from Takkiya Dawlat to Shah Abdul 'Azim in July of 1896. The image seems to have been taken in Takkiya Dawlat, where Nasir al-Din Shah's body was kept for the first few months. Nasir al-Din Shah's bier is placed on top of a platform that is set up above a few carpet covered steps in Takkiya Dawlat's main iwan. Candles are placed atop the platform and the bier is covered with flowers. The bier is accompanied by religious figures, guards and court officials, standing beside the bier on the platform and the steps. Above the bier a portrait painting of Nasir al-Din Shah - standing and in armor - is hung under another smaller painting that seems to depict Hussayn, the third Imam of Shi'i Islam. In the newspapers of the time, the death of Nasir al-Din Shah was likened to the death of Hussayn and the mourning period for the king likened to the Muharram mourning period of Tasu'a and 'Ashura. Considering the fact that Nasir was assassinated about a month and half before the Muharram mourning days ( 17th of Zi Gha'da) and his body was not moved from Takkiya Dawlat before the end of the Muharram mourning period, the two mourning periods coincided in date as well as the location." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "368."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Catafalque de feu Shah."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "4."
- On verso of the print, handwritten annotation (penciled) reads, "Ernst Höltzer."
Publications:
Iraj Afshar, Khatirat va Asnad-i Zahir al-Dawla, Tehran: Shirkat-i Sahami Kitabha-i Jibi, 1972, p:34 For more info on the symbolic relation of Qajar kings to the Shi'i Imams see: Afsaneh Najmabadi, Women with Moustaches Men without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity, University of California Press, 2005
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Ta'ziya Performance at the Takkiya Dawlat, Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 16.9 cm. x 12 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.02
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.s
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Le théatre religieux."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Group Prayer in the Courtyard of a Mosque [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Architecture
Religious buildings
Rites and ceremonies
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.53.01
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"Group prayer in the courtyard of a mosque. Another image that looks very similar in orientation and composition to this one is reproduced in Zayn al-`Abidin Maraghah'i's Zustände im heutigen Persien wie sie das reisebuch Ibrahim begs enthüllt. The image reproduced in the reference book is in reference to prayers in the city of Maratha. As such this image could be of the same city. It is however quite possible that the image in the book is just a representation of the Friday prayers and not particular to the city. In Ghasem Safi's book, another very similar image is identified as Friday prayers in Muayyir al-Dawla's mosque. A close comparison of the structure in the image and the plans of the mosque make this identification improbable. The mosque, however, in another very similar image in the same book is identified as Friday Mosque of Tehran." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "177) Prayers at Masjid i Shah (?)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 53.1: Isfahan - masjid-i Shah (?). Prayers (177)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Publications:
Ghasem Safi, Aksha-i Ghadimi-i Iran, Rijal, Manazir, Bana-ha, va Muhit-i Ijtima'i (Historical Photographs of Iran: Dignitariesm, Spectacles, Architecture, and Social Environment), Tehran: Intisharat va Chap-i Danishgah-i Tehran, 1989, p:228 & p:271
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex): Celebration Scene in the Garden [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.9 cm. x 12.7 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1894
Topic:
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.58.03
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"Most probably a scene from Aziz al-Sultan's wedding ceremony." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1163."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "339) Celebration in Gulistan palace." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 58.3: Tehran. Gulistan Palace. Celebration (339)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex): Celebration Scene in the Garden [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.7 cm. x 12.9 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1894
Topic:
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.60.09
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"Most probably a scene from Aziz al-Sultan's wedding ceremony. Small sticker on the bottom right side with '111' on it." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 60.9: Court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Muzaffar Al-Din Shah in Maydan-i Mashq [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh 1853-1907 Shah of Iran
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.9 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1896-1907
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.16.07
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"The image depicts Muzaffar al-Din Shah Qajar (b.1853-d.1906) on horseback and amongst a group of court attendants in Maydan-i Mashq. Maydan-i Mashq in Tehran was constructed during the reign of Fath Ali Shah Qajar and expanded and renovated during Nasir al-Din shah's reign and on the orders of Mirza Mohammad Khan Sipahsalar. The square was noted as the biggest one of its kind in Tehran." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1149."
- Scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "650."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "Nasr ed Din + Court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 16.7: Nasr ud Din and court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Front Courtyard of Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace): Salam Ceremony [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1910
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.24.09
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"During the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty, what is now known as the Salam ceremony had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. During the ceremony the courtiers, military officials, European officials accompanied, in some cases and in the earlier days of Fath Ali Shah's reign, by the general population would attend the ceremony and paid their respects - or in this case their Nowruz greetings- to the residing Qajar King. The placement of everything from the king's hookah and small seating place on the throne to the arrangement of the different official and military groups in the garden were predetermined and following the traditions set in the earlier days of Qajar dynasty. The photo is most probably taken during Salam ceremony, however the difference in the decoration of the front balcony of the palace, when compared to another print of a similar ceremony in the archives (FSA A.4 2.12.GN.15.02) suggests that the ceremony might have been due to an official occasion other than Nowruz." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "The bottom edge is ragged. The glass is sowed off at the bottom edge."
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1131."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 24.9: Men outdoors." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Front Courtyard: Salam Ceremony [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.9 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.54.09
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
http://www.niavaranmu.com/Menu1/Description.aspx?id=325
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"During the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty, what is now known as the Salam ceremony had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. During the ceremony the courtiers, military officials, European officials accompanied, in some cases and in the earlier days of Fath Ali Shah's reign, by the general population would attend the ceremony and paid their respects to the residing Qajar King. The placement of everything from the king's hooka and small seating place on the throne to the arrangement of the different official and military groups in the garden were predetermined and following the traditions set in the earlier days of Qajar dynasty. The photo is taken during one of the official Salam ceremonies on either the occasion of Nowruz in the palace." (Nasir Al-Din Shah the Sultan)." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Top and bottom edges are chopped off."
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1113."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "244) Court of Nasr Din Shah." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 54.9: Nasr Din Shah and court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Nasir Al-Din Shah and Court [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1890
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies
Qajar dynasty
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.19.01
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"The image has a very specific date and description attributed to it in Mahdi Bamdad's book. The following is a summary of the description: In Ramadan of 1307 (May of 1890) the 57,000 tooman owed to the treasury is returned. Aqa Dali is cooking the beans and on the right Mirza Ali Akbar (Bamdad, vol.5, p:159-160) has received the bags of money to send to treasury. The figures are identified as: From Right to left: Mirza Muhammad Malijak Amin Khan, General, Amin Huzur, I'timad al-Harem Khaja-Bashi, Aqa Da'i, Aqa Da'i's son, Aqa Da'i's brother, Rika, Nasir Al-Din Shah, Aqa Muhammad Saray-dar, Mirza Sayyid Ali (Mirza Ali Akbar's son). The figure sitting beside the bags of money is Mirza Ali Akbar." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Faded handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1083."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "Nasr ed Din Shah + Court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 19.1: Nasr ud Din Shah and court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Dushan Teppe (Iran): Frontal View of the Royal Tent: Outdoor Gathering at Horse Racing Event [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1910
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies
Qajar dynasty
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.19.02
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"The photographer has erased any trace of a figure underneath the tent but from the direction of the attendants' gaze and posture, one can conclude that the king (probably Nasir Al-Din Shah) was sitting in the tent, receiving dignitaries." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Faded handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1083."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "Nasr ed Din Shah + Court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 19.2: Nasr ud Din Shah and court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Front Courtyard: Salam Ceremony [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 13 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Regalia (Insignia)
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.51.03
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"During the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty, what is now known as the Salam ceremony had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. During the ceremony the courtiers, military officials, European officials accompanied, in some cases and in the earlier days of Fath Ali Shah's reign, by the general population would attend the ceremony and paid their respects to the residing Qajar King. The placement of everything from the king's hooka and small seating place on the throne to the arrangement of the different official and military groups in the garden were predetermined and following the traditions set in the earlier days of Qajar dynasty.The photo is most probably taken in Salam ceremony, as part of the Nowruz festivities in the palace." (Nasir Al-Din Shah the Sultan)." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1162."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 51.3: Nasr Din Shah and court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex): Salam Ceremony [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Thrones
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.51.10
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"During the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty, what is now known as the Salam ceremony had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. During the ceremony the courtiers, military officials, European officials accompanied, in some cases and in the earlier days of Fath Ali Shah's reign, by the general population would attend the ceremony and paid their respects - or in this case their Nowruz greetings- to the residing Qajar King. The placement of everything from the king's hookah and small seating place on the throne to the arrangement of the different official and military groups in the garden were predetermined and following the traditions set in the earlier days of Qajar dynasty. The photo is taken during one of the official Salam ceremonies on either the occasion of Nowruz or the return of Nasir Al-Din Shah from one of his longer trips. It is also notable that in all such occasions, the guards and military personnel stand to the right side of the Shah and the left side of the photo. Nasir Al-Din Shah can be seen in the back of the image seating on the Marble Throne (Takht-i Marmar), receiving courtiers in front of the balcony. The crowd on the left side of the image are more interested in the photographer than the arrival of one of the dignitaries for the ceremony." (Nasir Al-Din Shah the Sultan)." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1011."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 51.10: Tehran. Gulestan. Opposite side of reception marble throne." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Front Courtyard of Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex): Salam Ceremony [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 12.8 cm. x 17.8 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1896
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Rites and ceremonies
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.00.04
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Mahdi Bamdad, Sharh-i Hal-i Rijal-i Iran dar Qarn-i 12,13,14 Hijri, Tehran: Intisharat-i Zavvar (Zavvar Publishing): 1992, Vol. 4, p:269 & vol. 2, p:320-323.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"The photo is of the attendants of an official Salam ceremony in Gulistan palace. The ceremony is most probably the Nowruz Salam ceremony. During the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty, what is now known as the Salam ceremony had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. During the ceremony the courtiers, military officials, European officials accompanied, in some cases and in the earlier days of Fath Ali Shah's reign, by the general population would attend the ceremony and paid their respects - or in this case their Nowruz greetings- to the residing Qajar King. The placement of everything from the king's hookah and small seating place on the throne to the arrangement of the different official and military groups in the garden were predetermined and following the traditions set in the earlier days of Qajar dynasty. The photo is taken during one of the official Salam ceremonies. It is notable that in all such occasions, the guards and military personnel stand to the right side of the Shah and the left side of the photo. The figure standing in the middle of the image and against the tree (in white) is Kamran Mirza (b.1858-d.1929), Nasir Al-Din Shah's son. The one standing right beside him on his right is Mirza Abd al-Vahab Khan Nizam al-Mulk (b.1849-d.1917). From 1889 till 1893 Nizam al-Mulk was the minister of the army. The photo must have been taken in this interval. The figure standing on the right side of the foreground with a tray in hand was usually a trusted officer of the court who would carry money in his tray." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten number in white (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "113."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Nasir Al-Din Shah Supervising a Banquet for Ashpazan [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.9 cm. x 12.9 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1896
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Rites and ceremonies
Qajar dynasty
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.17.02
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"Depicted most probably in one of his short trips outside the city of Tehran, Nasir al-Din Shah is sitting in the far end of the image, looking directly at the camera. Aziz al-Sultan is standing on the right side of the king and Aziz Khan-I Khaja is the taller figure at the edge of the tent on the left side of the king and the right side of the image. The courtiers and cooks of the palace, in the company of the king in such trips are shown preparing for a meal. In front of the row of kitchen staff, trays of ingrediates are laid out in two rows, with small cups into each, probably used for measuring the ingrediants before taking them to the cooking stations, outside the tent." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 17.2: Shah in tent." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex), Front Courtyard: Salam Ceremony [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.51.04
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"During the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty, what is now known as the Salam ceremony had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. During the ceremony the courtiers, military officials, European officials accompanied, in some cases and in the earlier days of Fath Ali Shah's reign, by the general population would attend the ceremony and paid their respects to the residing Qajar King. The placement of everything from the king's hooka and small seating place on the throne to the arrangement of the different official and military groups in the garden were predetermined and following the traditions set in the earlier days of Qajar dynasty. The photo is taken during one of the official Salam ceremonies on either the occasion of Nowruz or the return of Nasir Al-Din Shah from one of his longer trips. The long table set before the balcony and in front of the row of attendants suggests that the ceremony might be a Nowruz Salam ceremony. The shah is sitting on the Marble Throne in the dark spot of the background. The dramatic contrast in the photograph allows for the patterns beneath the fountains in the pool to become visible. It is also notable that in all such occasions, the guards and military personnel stand to the right side of the Shah and the left side of the photo." (Nasir Al-Din Shah the Sultan)." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 51.4: Nasr Din Shah and court." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran), Entrance to Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace Complex) from Maydan-i Arg (Arg square or the old Canons' square): Zurkhana Wrestlers' Performance, possibly Part of Nowruz Festivities [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 12.9 cm. x 17.9 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1900
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies
Wrestling
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.00.05
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"A large crowd of spectators gather around a group of Zurkhana wrestlers' performance in the courtyard in front of the Iwan-i Takht, Gulistan palace's entrance. The proximity of the view to the wrestlers, along with the elevated position of the camera means that the photograph has been taken atop a balcony in the entrance complex, overlooking the performance. The depiction is therefore reaffirms the presence of the photographer amongst the guests of the court, observing the performance alongside the other dignitaries and apart from the crowd in the Maydan." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Tehran (Iran): Kakh-i Gulistan (Gulistan Palace), Front Courtyard of the Palace: Possibly Part of Nowruz Festivities [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.9 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880-1889
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Palaces
Qajar dynasty
Rites and ceremonies
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.15.02
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
http://www.niavaranmu.com/Menu1/Description.aspx?id=325
Ghasem Safi, Historical Photographs of Iran: Dignitaries, Spectacles, Architecture and Social Environment, Tehran: Mu'assisa-i Intisharat va Chap-i Danishgah-i Tehran, 1989, p:220
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"During the reigns of the first four kings of Qajar dynasty, what is now known as the Salam ceremony had gradually gained a special ceremonial function and was conducted with considerable care and through strict observance of specific rituals. During the ceremony the courtiers, military officials, European officials accompanied, in some cases and in the earlier days of Fath Ali Shah's reign, by the general population would attend the ceremony and paid their respects - or in this case their Nowruz greetings- to the residing Qajar King. The placement of everything from the king's hooka and small seating place on the throne to the arrangement of the different official and military groups in the garden were predetermined and following the traditions set in the earlier days of Qajar dynasty. The photo depicts a close up of part of the Salam ceremony in which the court and military officials would approach the throne's balcony and pay their respects to the king. The two figures at the back of the image and in front of the tree are Kamran Mirza - Nasir al-Din Shah's son- and Aziz al-Sultan. The figure in the foregournd - identified as Nizam al-Mulk (b.1830-d.1889) - blocks the view to the event in the background of the image which has captured the attention of Kamran Mirza and a few other attendants on either sides of the scene. The photo is most probably taken during the Salam ceremony, as part of the Nowruz festivities in the palace." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "The glass negative is chipped off on the right and the bottom sides."
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 15.2: Military review." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Group of Attendants at a Religious Gathering [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 21.6 cm. x 16.2 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.09
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of a Group of Attendants at a Religious Gathering [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.9 cm. x 15.8 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Rites and ceremonies
Women
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.48b
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Ta'ziya Performance at the Takkiya Dawlat, Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 23 cm. x 17 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.38
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "52."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

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