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Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Kākh-i Gulistān (Tehran, Iran)
Physical description:
1 album (99 photoprints): b&w; 31.2 cm. x 41.6 cm. (sheet)
62 albumen prints : b&w; 25 cm. x 20 cm. or smaller
Culture:
Qajar dynasty Iran 1794-1925
Type:
Albumen prints
Collection descriptions
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Bandar Anzalī (Iran)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Qazvīn (Iran)
Qum (Iran)
Rasht (Iran)
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
2011
Topic:
Qajar dynasty
Architecture
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Landscapes
Executions and executioners
Hairstyles
Headgear
Jewelry
Military
Musical instruments
Palaces
Portrait photography
Religious buildings
Royalty (Nobility)
Shrines
Street vendors
Thrones
Women
Local number:
FSA A2011.03
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Summary:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Jay A. Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs, 1969-1985

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Physical description:
18 albumen prints : b&w
Type:
Albumen prints
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1985
1969-1985
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Landscapes
Executions and executioners
Headgear
Portrait photography
Religious buildings
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.15
Notes:
Jay A. Bisno (b. 1939) was Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History curator of archaeology.
Summary:
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Cite as:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Jay Bisno, 1985
See more items in:
Jay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs 1969-1985
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs

Creator:
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Collector:
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Photographer:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Muzaffar al-Dīn Shāh 1853-1907 Shah of Iran
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Reza Shah Pahlavi Shah of Iran 1878-1944
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
Photographic prints : 66 items; various dimensions
Glass Negatives : 695 items; b&w ; 13 cm. x 18 cm
Photographic prints : 98 items; various dimensions
Type:
Photographic prints
Collection descriptions
Glass negatives
Gelatin silver prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Iraq
India
Uzbekistan
Baghdad (Iraq)
Basṭām (Iran)
Bīshāpūr (Extinct city)
Dāmghān (Iran)
Delhi (India)
Fīrūzābād (Iran)
Hamadān (Iran)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Naqsh-i Rustam (Iran)
Pasargadae (Extinct city)
Persepolis (Iran)
Tāq-e Bostān Site (Iran)
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1933
Topic:
Abbasids
Ancient Near Eastern Art
Antiquities
Architecture
Art of the Islamic World
Clothing and dress
Criminal procedure
Executions and executioners
Headgear
Inscriptions
Landscapes
Portrait photography
Pottery
Relief (Sculpture)
Religious buildings
Royalty (Nobility)
Sassanids
Shrines
Textile design
Local number:
FSA A.04 2.12
Notes:
Titles and summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin managed and operated one of the most successful commercial photography studios in Tehran in the late 19th century. Born in the 1840s in Iran, Sevruguin's mother returned with her children to her hometown of Tbilisi after his father Vassil, a Russian diplomat in Iran, died in a horse riding accident. Trained as a painter, Sevruguin returned to Iran in the early 1870s accompanied by his two brothers, establishing a photography studio first in Tabriz and then Tehran. His studio's ties to Tbilisi, however, persisted through the years; many of the early portraits of Dervishes and women have been simultaneously attributed to Antoin Sevruguin and Dimitri Yermakov, the Georgian photographer who is often referred to as Sevruguin's mentor from Tbilisi. Many of Antoin Sevruguin's photographs were published as early as 1885 in travelogues, journals and books indicating that by that time he had a fully established practice in Tehran's Ala al-Dawla street, with ties to the court of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar. Often unacknowledged as the producer of published images in his own time - the 1902 photographic survey of Persepolis being the most glaring of such authorial misrepresentations - he was nevertheless celebrated and acknowledged for his artistic vision and his keen eye for composition, achieving the Medal of Lion and Sun from Nasir al-Din Shah, the 1897 Medal of Honour in the Brussels International Exposition, and the 1900 Medal of Honour in Paris International Exposition. Reflecting a career that spans nearly half a century, Sevruguin's diverse body of work includes studio portraits of families, women and dervishes, survey photographs of archeological sites, objects, landscapes and architecture, and photographs of royalty, high officials and ceremonies of the Qajar court. The range of his output not only demonstrates his own pictorial concerns and artistic abilities but also the divergent interests of his clients. Despite numerous devastating incidents throughout his career - the loss of more than half of his negatives in a 1908 blast and fire, an unsuccessful attempt at diversifying into cinematography in the 1910s, and the confiscation of the remainder of his negatives in the mid-1920s to name a few - his studio remained operational even after his death in 1933. A number of negatives from the Sevruguin studio can be dated to the years after Antoin's death, indicating that the Sevruguin studio continued to be commercially viable. As one of the most prolific early commercial photographers in Iran, Antoin Sevruguin's artistic legacy has since proved far more enduring.
Summary:
- 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints, unmounted, were a gift from Joseph Upton, received by the committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953. The 66 photoprints were initially purchased by Joseph Upton in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran.
- 695 glass negatives were included into the "Islamic Archives," which was administered jontly by the committee for Islamic Culture and the committee for Arabic and Islamic Studies of the American Council of Learned Societies. According to the official minutes, the committee for Islamic Culture reported purchasing the 696 glass plates during their fiscal years 1951-1952 from the American Presbyterian Mission in Tehran. Antoin Sevruguin's daughter gave these plates to the mission with instruction that they be sold for the benefit of the mission.
- 98 gelatin silver photoprints were collected by Myron Bement Smith after he viewed a portion of Sevruguin's negatives in 1934 ( these include recent finds in the Myron Bement Smith collection).
In addition of Antoin Sevruguin's 695 glass negatives and 164 silver gelatin prints in the Myron Bement Smith collection the Archives holds: 18 albumen prints in theJay Bisno Collection of Sevruguin Photographs (FSA A.15); 34 photographic prints in the Ernst Herzfeld Papers (FSA A.6); as well as a photograph album and individual albumen prints donated by Stephen Arpee (FSA A2011.03). Finally, the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives also own 3 separate gelatin silver prints.
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of Bandar Anzali (Iran) Shoreside [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 16.8 cm. x 10.6 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Bandar Anzalī (Iran)
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.04b
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"As the entrance city of European travellers, Anzali port in the north side of Iran has been a subject of photographs and lithographs from around 1870s." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Port of Anzelli."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of a Chapar-Khana or In-Road Station [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.7 cm. x 15.5 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Architecture
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.06b
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"Chapar-Khana was a station placed on the busiest routes of travel, traditionally to provide fresh horses for the Chapar or the messangers of the empire. Smaller in structure than a Caravanserai, Chapar-Khanas aquired a more diverse status in the later years of 19th century, acting both as post offices and mid-road hostels. Their overal plan however resembles that of the caravanserai with taller round corners. The photo depicts the entrance to a Chapar-Khana, possibly the Hassan Abad Chapar-Khana on route to Qazvin." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Chappar Khàne."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Khiaban-i Ala al-Dawla (Firdawsi Avenue), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.3 cm. x 16.5 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.26
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "100."
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1120."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "196."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Avenue Alla es Douleh à Tehéran."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled) in English reads, "47.P.33.3."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Safid Rud Valley [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.8 cm. x 17 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.04
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "109."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "4?6."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Séfid Roud."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

View of Shushtar (Iran), including a Bridge [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.7 cm. x 16.7 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Shūshtar (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.44
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "493."
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1580."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "---(?)."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled) in English reads, "Shuster."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Shiraz (Iran): Cultivated Fields and Gardens [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 23.8 cm. x 17.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Shīrāz (Iran)
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.46.09
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Very yellowish brown color all over."
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "56."
- Handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "289."
- Scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "201."
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "108) General view of Shimran." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 46.9: Tehran. Shimran. General view (#108)." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Vicinity of Rasht (Iran): Safavid Bridge and Tower [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 24 cm. x 18 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Rasht (Iran)
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Architecture
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.80
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"The bridge is the subject matter of the photo which has been taken from a position that allows for the whole structure to fir in the boundaries of the image. The figures on top of the bridge bring a sense of scale to the image. On top of the bridge there are two shadows in the same spot. There are of the same person moving. The same can be said about the shadow on the foot of the bridge." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "433."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "46.5."
- On verso of the print (lower left corner), original stamp, in French and Persian, reads, "Photographie Sevruguin."
- On verso of the print, Myron Bement Smith caption in English reads, "Persia; Gīlān; Rasht; Bridge."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

North of Tehran (Iran): Bagh-i Firdaws (Garden of Paradise) at Shimiran [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 18 cm. x 12.8 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
1890-1920
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.20.07
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"The palace/residence is shown almost in the centre of the background of the scene. The structure can be identified as Bagh-i Firdaws by its very distinct and imposing façade and entrance. The residence was initially built on the site of Muhammad Shah Qajar's Mohamaddiya Palace by Muayyir al-Mamalik. Nasir's chief of finance and treasury, Muayyir al-Mamalik was also the first Iranian who opened an account in the British Royal bank and transferred a large part of his belonging to that account. The house was decorated with sheets of gold and marble and known to the contemporaneous travelers to Iran as one of the most extravagant structures of its time." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Handwritten information on slip of paper (from a 1943-1944 cash book, produced by the Bathni Brothers, Tehran) reads, "184) Dyzashur." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 20 (# 187): Dyzashur - landscape." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Publications:
Mahdi Bamdad, Sharh-i Hal-i Rijal-i Iran dar Qarn-i 12,13,14 Hijri, Tehran: Intisharat-i Zavvar (Zavvar Publishing): 1992, Vol.1, p:495-501
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Province of Gilan (Iran): Park Area at Port of Bandar Anzali [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Nāsir al-Dīn Shāh Shah of Iran 1831-1896
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.7 cm. x 12.7 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Bandar Anzalī (Iran)
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.13.02
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
"The photos depict the official buildins of Bandar-I Anzali (also called Bandar-I Pahlavi) or Anzali port. The port of Anzali on the south edge of the Caspian sea and to the north of Tehran was renamed to Pahlavi in 1934. As such the photo mush have been taken after the death of Antoine Sevruguin and by someone associated with his studio." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 13.(?): Garden by river." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of Mountaneous Route [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 22.3 cm. x 16.5 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.01
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

[Trabzon (Turkey): Photograph of the Harbor] [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; --.- cm. x 11.3 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Europe
Turkey
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Architecture
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.61
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Archives staff.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of Landscape on Road to Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 22.8 cm. x 17 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.05a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "View on road to Teheran."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of Mountaneous Route [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 22.6 cm. x 16.2 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.06a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Road over the Elburz Mountains."
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Arpee Album: Photograph of Sardar-I Almasiyya (Gate to Almasiyya Street), Tehran (Iran) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 16.8 cm. x 10.9 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photograph albums
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Tehran (Iran)
Date:
Ca.1880
Topic:
Architecture
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 A.10a
Notes:
Title and Summary notes are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"This entrance to the Gulistan palace complex constituted one end of one of the earliest stone-covered streets of Tehran, refered to as Khiyaban-I Almasiyya. The street was also known as Bab-I Humayun. During Riza Shah's time the gate visible in the image was replaced by a brick one, later to be removed altogether." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
- FSg curatorial research specialist remark on Antoin Sevruguin photo condition reads, "Albumen print, faded on the outer boundaries."
- On the mount, below the photographic print, handwritten caption (inked) in English reads, "Ambassador Street Teheran."
Publications:
Henry Binder, Au Kurdistan En Mesopotamie et en Perse, Paris: Maison Quantin, 1887, p:392
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Chapar-Khana or In-Road Station [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Physical description:
1 albumen print : b&w ; 20.6 cm. x 15.9 cm
Type:
Albumen prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s - 1930
Topic:
Architecture
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A2011.03 B.04
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
"Chapar-Khana was a station placed on the busiest routes of travel, traditionally to provide fresh horses for the Chapar or the messangers of the empire. Smaller in structure than a Caravanserai, Chapar-Khanas aquired a more diverse status in the later years of 19th century, acting both as post offices and mid-road hostels. Their overal plan however resembles that of the caravanserai with taller round corners. The photo depicts the entrance to a Chapar-Khana, possibly the Hassan Abad Chapar-Khana on route to Qazvin." [Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Curatorial Research Assistant]
Cite as:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., 2011
See more items in:
Stephen Arpee Collection of Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Gulhak (Iran): Garden in Diplomatic Compound [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 24 cm. x 18 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Sm.81
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "46.2."
- On verso of the print (lower left corner), original stamp, in French and Persian, reads, "Photographie Sevruguin."
- On verso of the print, Myron Bement Smith caption in English reads, "Persia; Path by Stream; "German embassy property in Gulhak"."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Building and View of the Alborz Mountains [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin d. 1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 glass negative : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 12.9 cm
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880-1930
Topic:
Landscapes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.GN.16.01
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, leaving behind only a fraction of his large collection of glass negatives, which is currently in the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
Summary:
- Myron Bement Smith handwritten caption in English reads, "47.P; Box 16.1: Landscape." [Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.1: Islamic Archives History, Collection Information; Box 60; Folder 44: 47 P: Antoine Sevruguin, glass negatives, Iran]
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

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