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Housing in Anacostia: Facts, Failure and Future

view Housing in Anacostia: Facts, Failure and Future digital asset number 1
Creator:
WETA-TV (Television station : Washington, D.C.)
Smith, Fletcher A
Federal City College. Project Accountability
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum
Subject:
Jones, Doug
Gray, Jesse
Cook, Willie
Jones, Theresa
Winter, Nadine P
Johnson, Sam
Kinard, John 1936-1989
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel
Crawford, H.R
Howard, O. O (Oliver Otis) 1830-1909
Douglass, Frederick 1817?-1895
Federal City College
Federal City College. Project Accountability
George Washington University
George Washington University. Congress Heights Project
Hospitality House, Inc. (Washington, D.C.)
Neighborhood Development Center #3 (Washington, D.C.)
National Tenants Organization
Neighborhood Legal Services Program (Washington, D.C.)
Southeast Neighborhood House (Washington, D.C.)
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home
Anacostia Community Museum
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum
United States Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands
Physical description:
2 open reel 1/2 inch video recording
Culture:
African American
Type:
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Congress Heights (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1973
Notes:
Title transcribed from recording.
The collection, Housing in Anacostia Video Project, contains original and master video materials created for the short documentary "On Housing," which was produced by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum. It features video documentation of the highway, streets, and homes in the neighborhood, interviews with residents about the community and the state of rundown housing buildings, and part of a lecture on housing in African American communities.
Summary:
Project Accountability, an urban research group of Federal City College, invited residents and representatives of local organizations concerned with housing in Anacostia to look at the results of their videotape research and to participate in discussion focusing on solutions and alternatives to the housing crisis. Program includes three videotaped recordings: The History of Housing in Anacostia, Private Housing in Anacostia, and Public Housing in Anacostia. The videotaped recordings include history of housing in Anacostia as well as current housing conditions. Louise Hutchinson of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum talks further about history of Anacostia housing, including racial discrimination during the purchase and development of land for blacks and later the emergence of public housing development. Doug Jones of the George Washington University Congress Heights Project talks about how private housing developed under the federal 608 program in Anacostia, the effects of the private housing development, and how housing conditions can improve. Jesse Gray of the National Tenants Organization talks about the future of public housing, and notes tenants are beginning to demand involvement in the operation of housing. Attorney Willie Cook, who represents tenants in court under the Neighborhood Legal Services, states everyone has a right to housing, profit needs to be taken out of housing, and Washington, D.C. needs home rule. Nadine P. Winter, the Executive Director of Hospitality House, advocates for urban homesteading and the right to own a home through sweat equity. Theresa Jones of Neighborhood Development Center #3 (also known as NDC 3) stresses the government is working for the developers, not the citizenry; and tenants need to organize to improve housing conditions. Sam Johnson of WETA-TV leads the program, and John Kinard of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum moderates the panel discussion. Anacostia residents address their questions and concerns about housing to panel participants.
Television special program. AV000822: part 1. AV004332: part 2. Part of Housing in Anacostia Video Project. Undated.
Cite as:
Housing in Anacostia: Facts, Failure and Future, Record Group 09-026, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
African Americans
Communities
Neighborhoods
African American neighborhoods
Housing
Public housing
Housing policy
Race discrimination
Housing management
Landlords
Landlord and tenant
Community development, Urban
Urban homesteading
Nacotchtank Indians
Home rule
Municipal home rule
Social history
Local number:
ACMA AV000822
ACMA AV004332
See more items in:
Housing in Anacostia Video Project
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
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