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To Achieve These Rights Exhibition Display 4

view To Achieve These Rights Exhibition Display 4 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Anacostia Museum
Whitehead, Henry P 1917-2002
Institute on Race Relations (Washington, D.C.)
Subject:
Terrell, Mary Church 1863-1954
Douglass, Frederick 1817?-1895
Todd, Tomlinson
Anacostia Community Museum
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum
Physical description:
2 cartridge 1/4 inch sound recording
Culture:
African American
Type:
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1992
Notes:
Title created by ACMA staff based on transcription from physical asset and name of related exhibition.
To Achieve These Rights Exhibition Display 4 is related to an exhibition which showcased 187 years of civil rights activism in Washington, D.C. by examining the African American journey toward racial equality in the nation's capital--from slavery and emancipation to voting rights, desegregation, and home rule. The exhibition was created by the Anacostia Museum and exhibited there from January 1992 to November 1992.
Born in Memphis, Tennessee in 1863, Mary Church Terrell attended Oberlin College and was one of the first African American women to earn a college degree. She was an educator, author, lecturer, and activist for civil rights and suffrage. She was founder and first president of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) and member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Terrell also led campaigns to desegregate Washington, D.C. She died in 1954 in Annapolis, Maryland.
Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was born into slavery on Maryland's Eastern Shore but fled north in 1838 to settle in Massachussetts. He soon became an abolitionist in the antislavery movement, and by the mid-1840s his commanding eloquence in offering firsthand testimony to the oppressions of slavery had transformed him into one of the movement's most persuasive spokesmen. Douglass' reforming zeal remained strong all his life. After the Civil War put an end to slavery, he continued to be a leading defender of the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction.
Tomlinson Todd was the Acting Director and President-Elect for the Institute on Race Relations, which existed from 1943-1951 in Washington, D.C. to circumvent the rising tide of segregation and discrimination in the United States. Todd was also the creator of "Americans All" radio program which aired in Washington, D.C. from 1946-1962. Through "Americans All," Todd fostered a dialogue between people from various backgrounds and initiated discussion concerning segregation and racial discrimination. By informing the American public about the significance of the theory of complete integration, he sought to shed light on the success of non-violent direct action and the importance of fighting against racial subordination. After discovering lost laws of 1872 which forbid restaurants and entertainment industries from serving African Americans after the Civil War, Todd worked to make discrimination against African Americans in public places a federal offense. Todd suffered a heart attack and died at the age of 76 in Washington, D.C.
Summary:
A clip from "Americans All" radio program broadcasted on February 12, 1950 in celebration of Frederick Douglass' birthday. Tomlinson Todd, leader of Institute on Race Relations, interviewed Mary Church Terrell, civil rights activist and friend of Douglass. Terrell spoke of her friendship with Douglass - how they met and visiting World's Fair in Chicago with Douglass. She proposed February 14 as Frederick Douglass day. Narration and radio program provides brief description of Todd, Terrell, Institute on Race Relations, and "Americans All."
Narration and radio broadcast clip for one of four displays used in exhibition: To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self-Determination in the District of Columbia, 1791-1978. Part of To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self-Determination in the District of Columbia, 1791-1978 Audiovisual Records. Dated 19920101.
Cite as:
To Achieve These Rights Exhibition Display 4, Exhibition Records AV03-033, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
African Americans
African American abolitionists
Abolitionists
Civil rights
Civil rights leaders
Activists
Local number:
ACMA AV003341
ACMA AV003342
See more items in:
To Achieve These Rights: The Struggle for Equality and Self-Determination in the District of Columbia, 1791-1978 Audiovisual Records
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives

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