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William S. Soule portraits of Chief Pacer and a Kiowa man, circa 1868-1874

view William S. Soule portraits of Chief Pacer and a Kiowa man, circa 1868-1874 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Soule, William S (William Stinson) 1836-1908
Physical description:
2 mounted prints : albumen
Culture:
Kiowa Indians
Kiowa Apache Indians
Indians of North America Great Plains
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Date:
1868
circa 1868-1874
Notes:
William Stinson Soule (1836-1908) was the photographer at Fort Sill (now in Oklahoma) from its founding in 1869 to the end of the Indian campaigns in 1874-1875. Soule moved from New England circa 1868, first working as a photographer at Fort Dodge, Kansas, then at Camp Supply with General Philip Sheridan's campaigning troops. As the photographer for the United States Army at Fort Sill, he photographed the construction of the fort as well as many of the people and events associated with the Indian Wars in that area. Soule left Fort Sill in 1875 to return to Boston where he joined his brother's Soule Photograph Co. and then operated the Soule Art Company until his death.
Summary:
Cabinet cards with portraits of Apache chief Pacer and a Kiowa man, both with blankets, braids wrapped in fur, and bows and arrows.
Cite as:
Photo Lot 97-6, William S. Soule portraits of Chief Pacer and a Kiowa man, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Local number:
NAA Photo Lot 97-6
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

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