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Mulberry Plantation, 2010

Landscape architect:
Briggs, Loutrel W.
Owner:
Chapman, Clarence
Provenance:
Little Garden Club of Rye
Physical description:
2 folders+ 2 35mm slides (photographs) + 27 digital images
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, South Carolina, Berkeley County, Moncks Corner
South Carolina
Moncks Corner
Mulberry Plantation (Moncks Corner, South Carolina)
Date:
2010
Notes:
The brick house at Mulberry Plantation was built on a bluff by the first owner, Thomas Broughton in 1714, the date inscribed in iron on the four weathervanes atop the four pavilions at the corners of the house. Situated along the Cooper River the current property comprises 805 acres and includes gardens on three levels: a formal boxwood parterre garden next to the house, a descending camellia walk, and a formal circle garden, all designed by Loutrel W. Briggs (b.1893-d.1977) circa 1930. Other features include a parterre kitchen garden, a Live oak alleĢe, lagoon, rolling lawns and the oldest mulberry tree in the country. The plantation grew rice at various times in its history, as well as indigo and forest products. Another 19th century commercial project that did not succeed was breeding silk worms to produce domestic silk, with mulberry trees planted to house the worms. By the early 20th century the property was in decline and was sold out of the Broughton family to Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Chapman as a winter retreat. The Chapmans restored the house and brought in Briggs, known for developing the Charleston style for the many small gardens he designed in the city and at other Cooper River plantations.
Mulberry Plantation was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. The style of the house has been described as Jacobean and French, with a mansard roof, rather than a typical low-country wooden structure. The brick house may have been used as a fortress against attacks during the Yamesse War in 1715, between settlers and Native Americans. At one time there were many slave cabins on the property but now only one remains that has been used as a hunting lodge.
Persons associated with the garden include Thomas Broughton and descendents (former owners, 1714-1914); Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Chapman (former owners, 1915-1981); Historic Charleston Foundation (former owners, 1981-1987); Loutrel Winslow Briggs (December 12, 1893-May, 1977) (landscape designer, circa 1930)
Summary:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, and photocopies of book excerpts and articles.
Publications:
This property is featured in Gardens of Colony and State compiled and edited by Alice G. B. Lockwood, published by The Garden Club of America, 2000; Carolina Gardens by E.T.H. Shaffer, The University of North Carolina Press, 1939; Plantations of the Low Country by William P. Baldwin, Jr., Greensboro NC: Legacy Publications, 1987; Lowcountry Plantations Today by William P. Baldwin, Jr., Legacy Publications 2002 Second Edition; The Dwellings of Colonial America by Thomas Tileston Waterman, The University of North Carolina Press, 1950; Colonial Homes in Southern States prepared by the staff of the Early American Society, Robert G. Minor, editor, published by Arno Press, c. 1977
Topic:
Gardens
Plantations
Local number:
SC061000
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens

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