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Takes The Lead. [Advertising card.]

view Takes The Lead. [Advertising card.] digital asset number 1
Advertiser:
Babbitt, B.T
Artist:
Bufford
Physical description:
1 item, col., 10 x 13.5 cm
Type:
Advertising cards
Date:
1880
Notes:
Benjamin Talbot Babbitt (1809-1889), according to Wikipedia, "was a self-made American businessman and inventor who amassed a fortune in the soap industry, manufacturing Babbitt's Best Soap." He held more than one hundred patents and invented his own processes to manufacture various types of soap, including the first soap in the form of individual bars. He was also considered an advertising genius, and his soap was among the first nationally advertised products. Unfortunately, his name became sullied when Sinclair Lewis chose "Babbitt" for the name of a vulgar businessman in his eponymous novel of 1922.
Summary:
Advertising card for B.T. Babbitt's Best Soap and Soap Powder. Text on verso is captioned "Beautiful Tribute to Women." Image on front of children sledding in sleds built with Babbitt's soap powder boxes. Text is entitled "Beautiful Tribute to Women." Image of two children in balloon, dropping bars of soap over the side. The text is quoted from a short story by Ann Sophia Stephens, "The Queen of a Week," published in "The Ladies' Companion," Jan. 1839, pp. 144-146.
Topic:
Sleds
Children in advertising
Women in advertising
Play
Winter
Local number:
Ivorydata4 872
0300600027 (Scan No.: both sides of card.)
See more items in:
Soap series, Warshaw Collection of Business Americana 1838-1953
Data Source:
Archives Center - NMAH

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