Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
1 documents - page 1 of 1

Cheekwood 1929-1997

Former owners:
Cheek, Leslie Mr. Mrs.
Sharp, Walter Mr. Mrs.
Landscape architect:
Fleming, Bryant
Coile, W. James
Callicott, P. Duncan
Sartor, Carolyn S
Horticulturist:
Andrews, Jenny
Landscape architects:
Kevin Tucker and Associates
Physical description:
2 folders+ 44 35 mm. slides
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
United States of America, Tennessee, Davidson County, Nashville
Tennessee
Nashville
Cheekwood (Nashville, Tennessee)
Date:
1929
1929-1997
Notes:
"Once the private estate of the Leslie Cheek family, of the Maxwell House Coffee forturne, Cheekwood is a stunning example of an elegant lifestyle. The three-story neo-Georgian mansion features architectural treasures from some of the great houses of Europe, selected by the Cheeks and their archictect, Bryant Fleming."
"Outstanding ornaments include towering mahogany doors, an Adam mantel of lapis lazuli, a magnificent staircase, brilliant chandeliers, and trompe l'oeil paintings to panel the walls. Today, the 55-acre Cheek Estate is a lasting tribute to one of the wealthiest eras in American history. Its stately mansion, built in 1929 with Tennessee limestone quarried on the property, is surrounded by breathtaking grounds designed by the Cheeks' landscape architect. The original gardens feature marble sculptures, water gardens, bubbling streams and grand vistas."
"Guests continue to marvel at the historical Bryant Fleming landscape. Surrounding his design are 11 principal botanical garden areas - the award winning Howe Wildflower Garden, an Herb Study Garden, the Wills Perennial Garden, the Carell Dogwood Trail and a traditional Japanese Garden. Botanic Hall features horticultural exhibits, flower shows, and the popular Trees of Christmas celebration every December. There is no better place to experience the season of Middle Tennessee."
Persons associated with the property include: Bryant Fleming (architect and landscape architect); W. James Coile (landscape architect); P. Duncan Callicott (landscape architect); Carolyn S. Sartor (landscape architect); Kevin Tucker and Associates (landscape architects); Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Cheek (former owners); Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sharp (former owners); and Jenny Andrews (horticulturist).
The folders include two slides of Cheekwood brochures and two slides from an article in Country Life magazine.
Summary:
Materials relating to the public gardens of the Tennessee Botanical Gardens and Fine Arts Center, located in Nashville, Tennessee. The folder includes a slide list, brochures of Cheekwood, plans of the property, excerpts from publications featuring the property, and a worksheet and description completed by GCA researchers Richard C. Page and Cynthia Wall.
Publications:
Garden has been featured in Whitney Clay,"Fourth-Graders Have a Special Link to Howe Garden," Nashville Banner, April 16, 1996
Garden has been featured in David R. Logsdon, "Standard Favorites Make Cheekwood's Wildflower Fair a Stand-out Affair," Nashville Banner, April 9, 1997
Garden has been featured in Nashville Tennessean, February 15, 1970
Garden has been featured in Walter R. Courtenay, "A Garden That Died in Wind Lives Anew," Nashville Banner, April 7, 1954
Topic:
Gardens
Local number:
TN045000
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens

Modify Your Search






or


Narrow By
  • Archival materials
  • Gardens
  • Andrews, Jenny
  • Callicott, P. Duncan
  • Cheek, Leslie
  • Coile, W. James
  • Fleming, Bryant
  • Kevin Tucker and Associates
  • Sartor, Carolyn S
  • Sharp, Walter
  • Andrews, Jenny
  • Callicott, P. Duncan
  • Cheek, Leslie
  • Coile, W. James
  • Fleming, Bryant
  • Kevin Tucker and Associates
  • Sartor, Carolyn S
  • Sharp, Walter
  • Cheekwood (Nashville, Tennessee)
  • Davidson County
  • Nashville
  • Tennessee
  • United States of America
  • Cheekwood (Nashville, Tennessee)
  • Davidson County
  • Nashville
  • Tennessee
  • United States of America
Filter results to a specific time period.
  • 1920s
  • 1930s
  • 1940s
  • 1950s
  • 1960s
  • 1970s
  • 1980s
  • 1990s
  • Archives of American Gardens