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Warner Bro's. [sic] Coraline Corset advertisement [trade card, ca. 1890-1900]

view Warner Bro's. [sic] Coraline Corset advertisement [trade card, ca. 1890-1900] digital asset number 1
Advertiser:
Warner Brothers (353 Broadway, New York, N.Y.)
Carpenter, F., & Co. Tiffin, Ohio
Keefer, J.P. (Chambersburg, Pa.)
Printer?:
Trautmann, Bailey, & Blampey, N.Y
Physical description:
1 item, 3-1/8" x 5"
Type:
Advertising cards
Trade cards
Date:
1890
1900
ca 1890-1900
1890-1910
19th century
Notes:
Two examples in collection: the one shown in neg. no. 87-10515 bears the maker's identification, but it is partly cut off in the other copy. This one also has a black-and-white Warner Brothers advertisement on the verso, with sale imprint of "F. Carpenter & Co., Tiffin, O." shown, while the other copy shows "J. P. Keefer, Chambersburg, Pa." as the seller.
In "Corsets" series, Box 4, Folder 6.
Summary:
Color illustration shows two cherubs or putti with a view camera, photographing a corset with a long-leafed plant growing from it. Mark of "Trautmann, Bailey & Blampey, N.Y." (printers?) below image. Coraline, a substitute for whalebone, was manufactured from ixtle, a plant grown in Mexico. "Scattered through the centre of these pulpy leaves are a number of round, tough, elastic fibres like bristles, which average about two feet in length. These leaves are gathered by the natives, and in a crude manner they are pounded and bruised until these fibres are separated from the pulpy portion. This is then dried and put into bales, in which condition it is shipped to our factory. Here we go over it again, carefully hackling and combing it until we have separated all the waste material, leaving only the long and perfect fibres. These fibres are then fed into the winding machine and are bound by stout thread into a firm, continuous cord, This cord, or "coraline," as it is now called, is then ready to be stitched into the corset, which is done in the same manner that ordinary cord is stitched between the folds of cloth. After the Coraline is stitched into the cloth, it passes through a tempering process by passing between heated dies. This is the most wonderful part of the invention, and it is its ability to receive a temper that makes Coraline so valuable as a stiffener for corsets. There is not more difference between soft iron and tempered steel, than between Coraline in its natural state and the same article after it has passed through this tempering process. No starch or artificial sizing of any kind is used, but it is a development of the natural elastic quality already existing in the Coraline, and this elasticity is therefore permanent. Corsets boned with cord may be so loaded with starch or glue that they will seem stiff when new, but this will disappear after a few days' use. Those stiffened with Coraline, on the other hand, grow more elastic with use. This is particularly noticeable in our bosom pads, and in the bust of the Health corsets, both of which are stiffened with Coraline cloth. Rub these until the starch is out of the cloth, and they are much more elastic than when new." (From another Coraline corsets advertisement, quoted in Wikipedia, http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Warner_Bros._Coraline_Corsets.
Cite as:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, ca. 1790-1945, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Topic:
Corsets
Cameras
View cameras
Photography--Apparatus and supplies
Angels
Putti
Local number:
00006011.jpg (AC Scan no.)
AC0060-0000901.tif (AC scan no.)
87-10515 (OPPS Neg.)
See more items in:
Corsets series, Warshaw Collection of Business Americana
Data Source:
Archives Center - NMAH

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