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Triumph of Virtue, The--Said to be Paul Veronese, (painting)

Artist:
Veronese (attributed to)
Type:
Paintings
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 91
This is an allegory. One sees a woman with the hands of a harpy, holding a pack of cards, and inclining towards a man who flies from her, and throws himself in the arms of Virtue, who comes forward and receives him. Vice is seated, and beneath her drapery is seen a sphynx and a dagger. In the background, there is a fragment of a monument, on the cornice of which, one finds the subject explained by the Latin words, "Honor et Virtus post mortem florent," implying, that those who observe the laws of honor and virtue, establish a name which will be imperishable. It was formerly in the Gallery of the Duke of Orleans, and was subsequently purchased in Rome, and brought to this country more than 20 years since by Vanderlyn. [P. 8.]
Albany Gallery of the Fine Arts, Incorporated 1846. Catalogue of the Second Exhibition. 1847. Albany: Printed by C. Van Benthuysen and Co. 1847.
Topic:
Figure group
Allegory--Quality--Virtue
State of Being--Phenomenon--Occult
Allegory--Quality--Vice
Occupation--Occult--Fortune Teller
Control number:
AECI 00590091
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

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