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Part II. Scene 8. Giant Despair Visits the Pilgrims in Their Dungeon and Advises Them to Commit Suicide, (painting)

Artist:
May
Medium:
Panorama
Type:
Paintings
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1848
1848-1852
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. NOT NUMBERED
"Now giant despair had a wife, and her name was diffidence; so, when he was gone to bed he told his wife what he had done; to-wit, that he had taken a couple of prisoners, and cast them into his dungeon for trespassing on his grounds. Then he asked her also what he had best do further with them. So she asked what they were, whence they came, and whither they were bound; and he told her. Then she counseled him, that when he arose in the morning he should beat them without mercy. So when he arose, he getteth him a grievous crab-tree cudgel, and goes down into the dungeon to them, and there first falls to rating them as if they were dogs, although they gave him never a word of distate: then he falls upon them, and beats them fearfully, in such spot that they were not able to help themselves, or to turn them upon the floor. This done, he withdraws, and leaves them there to condole their misery, and to mourn under their distress: so all that day they spent their time in nothing but sighs and bitter lamentations. The next night she, talking with her husband further about them, and understanding that they were yet alive, did advise him to counsel them to make away with themselves. So, when morning was come, he goes to them with as surly a manner as before, and perceiving them to be very sore with the stripes that he had given them the day before, told them, that since they were never like to come out of that place, their only way would be forthwith to make an end of themselves, either with a knife, halter or poison. For why, he said, should you choose to live, seeing it is attended with so much bitterness. But they desired him to let them go. With that he looked ugly upon them, and rushing to them, had doubtless made an end of them himself, but that he fell into one of his fits (for he sometimes, in sunshiny weather fell into fits), and lost for a time the use of his hands. Wherefore he withdrew, and left them, as before, to consider what to do." [P. 20.]
A Descriptive Catalogue of the Bunyan Tableaux. Albany, N.Y.: J. Munsell, 82 State Street, 1867.
Artist address: New York, New York.
Topic:
Literature--Bunyan--Pilgrim's Progress
State of Being--Phenomenon--Dream
Religion--Christianity
Fantasy--Monster
State of Being--Death--Suicide
Figure(s) In Interior--Castle
Control number:
AECI 03250036
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

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