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Jose Maria Vigil Zuazo, (painting)

Artist:
Stanley, John Mix
Subject:
Zuazo, Jose Maria Vigil
Type:
Paintings
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1852
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 93
(Painted 1852.) [P. 56; entry includes a history of the Pueblo Indians.] - 'The origin and antiquity of the country and of our first ancestors date many ages back. We are wholly ignorant of the year and the time past by which to regulate the history correct- ly, nor is my ability sufficient to give information of a nation so ancient. ' Without doubt, this nation from its beginning was called tegua. It was a rude, infidel nation, without religion - idol- atrous, and without the observance of any worship; but their customs were extremely good and agreeable to the inabitants of this pueblo. ' They were governed by the cacique and a war captain, and other principal men of the pueblo. So good were the customs which they themselves had chosen and established for the common- weal, and which they loved and embraced rigorously, and with much pleasure, that all were happy. Their crops were in abundance, all goods were in common, and they were favoured by the almighty with union and good conduct. ' They lived under the rule of their magistrates and chiefs from among themselves, during the first conquest. At that time they knew religion, and were catholics. In a short time the Spaniards were driven from the country to their own land by the Indians, and in a few years came the second conquest, which remains permanent to this time. ' During the preceding years they were held in dislike by their conquerers. All the Indians of the country were under arms, and despised and persecuted by the Spaniards. ' This nation was so warlike that the Spaniards did not find any action conclusive, till a man of much force, and possessing the endurance of a nation which had passed through many troub- les, appeared in all the manliness and energy of character that can be imagined. The gentleman mentioned was a native of the pueblo of San Diego de Tesuque - his name is Don Domingo Romeo. this great man established a peace with the Spaniards for his people - a peace wise and eternal. As to the other pueblos, they again took arms against the Spaniards: this pueblo was not seduced by the other pueblos.'" [P. 56.]
Portraits of North American Indians, with Sketches of Scenery, etc., painted by J.M. Stanley. Deposited with the Smithsonian Institution. Washington: Smithsonian Institution. December, 1852.
Topic:
Portrait male
Ethnic--Pueblo
Control number:
AECI 02960093
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

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