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Venus of the Bath, (sculpture)

Artist:
Unknown
Unknown (Antique artist) (copy after)
Medium:
Cast/plaster
Type:
Sculptures
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 9
All the draped Venuses are referable to an early period of Greek art, when the sculptors did not think it decorous to represent the goddess quite nude. Every reader of classical literature will remember that when Cnidus had boldly entured to offer the people of Cos a nude Venus, Praxiteles was called upon to rival it with a clothed image. As taste became more luxurious and morals more lax, the nude figures were altogether preferred. One of the finest of these in point of execution, though it quite sinks the goddess to the woman, is the "Venus at the Bath," of which there are several examples. The original of the one in the present collection is in the Louvre, and is conjectured to be a copy from the Venus of Polycharmes, a work that was taken to Rome in the time of Pliny, who mentions it. There is a beautiful harmony in the contours, but it appeals to no high sentiment. The plaster copy is the same size as the original--3 ft. 1 in. [Pp. 5-6; exhibited under heading: "Catalogue of Casts."]
Fifth Exhibition, 1873-1874. San Francisco Art Association Catalogue. Price, 25 cts.
Topic:
Mythology--Classical--Venus
Figure female
Recreation--Leisure--Bathing
Control number:
AECI 02860009
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

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