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The Roman Forum, (painting)

Artist:
Cooke, George
Type:
Paintings
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 9
"The ancient Roman Forum - the theatre of most of the great public events, and once the great centre of all the business, power and splendor of rome - was a space of very considerable extent, between the Capitoline and Palestine Hills; or, more properly, extending from the foot of the former on the east, along the base of the latter on the north. This was surrounded with temples, basilicas, and various public edifices and monu- ments. " To the extreme right of the picture is seen the site of the ancient palace of the Caesars, the ruins of which skirt the Palatine Hill. to the left of this, in the foreground, are the remains of a temple, supposed to have been dedicated to fortune. There are still standing eight columns - six in front, and one each side - of granite, and of the ionic order, having an entab- lature and a pediment. Beyond these are three columns of the portico of a temple, built by Augustus in honor of Jupiter Tonans, or Jove the Thunderer, in commemoration of and grat- itude for his escape from lightning. A part of the entablature and frieze also remains . . . to the left of this temple com- mences the ascent to the capitol. farther down is the triumphal arch of septimus severus, erected in the beginning of the third century, . . . back of the temple of severus were the curia hostilia, where the senate used to assemble - so called, because erected by tullus hositlius. on these ruins now stands the church of st. theodore. . . . next to this comes the temple of remus, also converted into a church; and beyond, showing three arches, the temple of peace. near the centre of the picture is phoca's column, erected in honor of the emperor of that name. the base of this column - which cannot be seen in the picture, and which, from the accumulation of dirt around it, is between twenty and thirty feet below the surface - is square, and ascended on every side by steps. . . . " In the distance will be recognized the gigantic coloseum, said to the be most magnificent ruin in the world. . . . the top of trajan's column may be seen over beyond the church of st. theodore; it stands before two churches. . . a procession of franciscan monks is seen approaching in the direction of phoco's column. " The smaller buildings, not described, are churches - former- ly temples. . . ." [P. 9-11; excerpted from 250-line commentary on the forum.]
Descriptive Catalogue of Paintings in the Gallery of Daniel Pratt, Prattville, Alabama. Together with a Memoir of George Cooke, Artist. Prattville: Howell & Luckett, Printers. 1853.
Topic:
Cityscape--Italy--Rome
Cityscape--Foreign--Italy
Architecture--Classical--Forum
Architecture--Ruins
Architecture--Religious--Temple
Architecture--Classical--Triumphal Arch
Control number:
AECI 02480009
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

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