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Opoeth-Le-Yo-Hola. Speaker of the Upper Creeks, (painting)

Artist:
Stanley, John Mix
Subject:
Opoeth Le Yo Hola
Type:
Paintings
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 9
"This man holds the rank of the principal counsellor or speaker of the councils, over which he presides, with great dignity. His influence is so great, that the questions submitted to council are generally decided according to his will, for the Indians consider him as the organ of their chief, and suppose he only speaks as he is directed. His power is such over them, that they have frequently requested him to submit himself, as a candidate, for the principal chieftainship, but he prefers his position as speaker, which brings him more immediately in contact with his people, and gives him the advantage of displaying his address and eloquence. . . ."--McKinney's work, PP. not given-- ' During the late unhappy contest between the united states and Seminole Indians, it was to be expected that the sympathies of the Creeks, would be strongly excited in favor of the latter, who are a wandering tribe, descendants from the Creek nation. Accordingly, in 1836, when the war grew hot, and the Seminoles were successful in several sanguinary engagements, the spirit of revolt spread through the Creek nation, and many of that people were urged, by the fatal destiny, which seemed to have doomed that whole race to extinction, into open war. Sau-Gah-At-Chee, one of the towns of Opoeth-Le-Yo-Holo's district was the first to revolt. The warriors, without a single exception, painted themselves for war; the young men rushed out upon the highways, and murdered all the travellers who fell in their way. Opoeth- Le-Yo-Holo, on hearing the intelligence, immediately placed himself at the head of the warriors of his own town, marched upon the insurgents, burned their village, and having captured some of their men, delivered them over to the military, by whom they were imprisoned.' - McKinney's work, pp -- " Creeks. These people formerly resided in Georgia and Alabama, but were removed by the United States government in 1836. And are now residing on the Arkansas, seven hundred miles west of the Mississippi. They are somewhat advanced in civilization and the arts. They mostly follow agricultural pursuits, having extenstive farms, and many negroes. The principal productions of the soil, are corn and sweet potatoes; they raise some cotton, from which they manufacture a very substantial cloth, suitable to their own wants. Vegetables of almost every description are produced in abundance. They raise large stocks of horses, hogs and cattle, to which their country is well adapted, being mostly prairie and one of the finest grazing countries in the world. " They adhere tenaciously to all their ancient customs, with a superstitious awe and veneration, having among them their rain makers, medicine or mystery men, in the potency of whose mysteries, they are firm believers." [P. 7-8.]
Catalogue of Pictures, in Stanley and Dickerman's North American Indian Portrait Gallery; J.M. Stanley, Artist. Cincinnati: Printed at the "Daily Enquirer Office." 1846.
Topic:
Portrait male
Ethnic--Creek
Control number:
AECI 02200009
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

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