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Telling stories in the face of danger : language renewal in Native American communities / edited by Paul V. Kroskrity

Catalog Data

Author:
Kroskrity, Paul V. 1949-  Search this
Physical description:
xi, 269 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
America
Date:
2012
C2012
Contents:
Sustaining stories : narratives as cultural resources in Native American projects of cultural sovereignty, identity maintenance, and language revitalization / Paul V. Kroskrity -- Kiowa stories express tribal memory, ideology and being / Gus Palmer Jr. -- You're talking English, Grandma : language ideologies, narratives, and Southern Paiute linguistic and cultural reproduction / Pamela A. Bunte -- The politics of storytelling in northwestern California : ideology, identity, and maintaining narrative distinction in the face of cultural convergence / Sean O'Neill -- Tales of tradition and stories of syncretism in Kiowa language revitalization / Amber A. Neely -- Kumiai stories : bridges between the oral tradition and classroom practice / Margaret C. Field -- They don't know how to ask : pedagogy, storytelling, and the ironies of language endangerment on the White Mountain Apache Reservation / M. Eleanor Nevins and Thomas J. Nevins -- Growing with stories : ideologies of storytelling and the narrative reproduction of Arizona Tewa identities / Paul V. Kroskrity -- Silence before the void : language extinction, Maliseet storytelling, and the semiotics of survival / Bernard C. Perley -- To give an imagination to the listener : replicating proper ways of speaking in and through contemporary Navajo poetry / Anthony K. Webster
Summary:
"Highlighting language renewal programs, Telling Stories in the Face of Danger presents case studies from various North American communities that show tribal stories as vehicles of moral development, healing, and the construction of identity. . . Several essays presented here describe successful efforts to maintain, revitalize, and renew narrative traditions or to adapt them to new institutions, such as schools. Others consider less successful efforts, noting conflicts among older and younger tribal members or differences between academic and traditional language expertise or between insiders and outsiders. The contributors, some of whom are members of the communities they describe, also examine the use of narrative as an act of resistance." -- Provided by publisher.
Topic:
Languages--Social aspects  Search this
Language and culture  Search this
Ideology  Search this
Ethnic identity  Search this
Anthropological linguistics  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_998359