Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Portrait of Guglielmo Marconi from Scientific Identity: Portraits from the Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology.

Catalog Data

Type:
Photographic prints
Place:
Italy
Date:
1900-1950
Book Title:
Scientific Identity: Portraits from the Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology.
Caption:
Portrait of Guglielmo Marconi.
Educational Notes:
Picture the telephone you use to call your friends and family. Now imagine them on the machine in the photo, pictured alongside its inventor, Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937). Marconi began experimenting with wireless communications as a child growing up in Italy. In 1896, at the age of 22, he was granted the world’s first patent for wireless telegraphy. Marconi set up his first wireless telegraph stations across the English Channel in 1899 and across the Atlantic Ocean in 1901. He did this after having successfully proved in 1900 that the curve of the Earth did not harm the quality of the message! His proof led to the discovery of the ionosphere – a layer of the atmosphere that reflects radio waves. The wired telegraph worked by sending electrical pulses down a cable in a coded message – usually Morse code – that could be printed out as a series of hole punches and then translated by the operator at the other end. Marconi, with Karl Ferdinand Braun, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1909.
Topic:
Engineering  Search this
Physics  Search this
Invention  Search this
Radio  Search this
Marconi, Guglielmo  Search this
Image ID:
SIL-SIL14-m001-13
Catalog ID:
710499
Rights:
No Copyright - United States
See more items in:
See Wonder
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:silgoi_68469