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Catalog Data

Artist:
Harry Bertoia, born San Lorenzo, Italy 1915-died Barto, PA 1978  Search this
Medium:
brazed and welded brass and bronze
Dimensions:
142 1/4 x 231 1/4 x 81 in. (361.4 x 587.4 x 205.8 cm)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
1959
Gallery Label:
Harry Bertoia's sculptural installation reflects the optimism of the 1950s, when the economy boomed and broadcast television was transforming American culture. The largest cluster of the sculpture symbolizes the world transmitting light to the smaller forms that represent sight, sound, and electronic control, each of which also emits luminous impulses. Bertoia explained that "we live in a time dominated by...invisible forces....these [are] elements of the atomic and electronic age that I am trying to give sculptural shape and form." Bertoia's vision of global communications is a reality today, as satellites constantly receive and transmit signals for broadcast, cell phone, and computer communications.
Topic:
Abstract  Search this
Allegory\arts and sciences\technology  Search this
Allegory\element\energy  Search this
Allegory\life\Atomic Age  Search this
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Zenith Corporation
Object number:
1979.107A-D
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Department:
Painting and Sculpture
On View:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 3rd Floor, East Wing
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:saam_1979.107A-D